Reid Skelton-Morven, Blair Mirau, Barry Cunningham, Mayor Lee Brain and Gurvinder Randhawa watch as the results for the 2018 general election come in. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

Council and trustee results in Prince Rupert

At 8 p.m. the polls close and the counting begins, stay tuned for updates

All four city councillor incumbents have been re-elected, with two newcomers to join ‘the team’.

Thirty-three per cent of eligible voters in Prince Rupert cast their vote on Oct. 20, three per cent below the provincial average.

Blair Mirau came in with most votes, followed by Barry Cunningham, Gurvinder Randhawa, Wade Niesh, Nick Adey and Reid Skelton-Morven.

“I’m pretty surprised, the four incumbents have actually the most votes, which I think is a pretty good statement from the community that they like the direction that we’re headed,” Mirau said while looking at the results inside the Jim Ciccone Civic Centre.

Mirau, for the second election in a row, had the most votes with 2,221. In the last election, Mirau received the most votes with 2,915, according to CivicInfoBC.

“I can’t thank the community enough, that’s truly humbling,” he said. “I don’t take anything for granted. I’m making sure that I’m getting out there, that I’m listening to people, I’m knocking on doors, I’m going out in the pouring rain.

“It’s just a relentless focus on the future, it’s not about me, it’s not about any particular candidate, it’s about the future and the potential Prince Rupert has.”

One of the newcomers to council, Skelton-Morven, at 25 years, was the youngest to be elected. The entrepreneur has fresh plans for local government.

“I definitely want to bring a ton of new ideas and entrepreneurial perspective as well. Pull from my background in finding different ways for the city to rectify, to clear its revenue and infrastructure challenges, to not solely rely on tax revenue but to find alternative sources as well,” he said adding that it’s just scratching the service of what he wants to accomplish.

Mayor Lee Brain was also at the civic centre awaiting results with his future team. Brain was acclaimed in September when he had no other contenders for his position.

“I was open to whatever the results were going to be,” he said.

“This team that came together is the team. We have great momentum now and you know Watson Island is bringing in some new income now, starting with the downtown, with the DQ announcement there’s a huge momentum happening now, so I think in the next four years we’re going to see even more transformation.”

Despite their hard work, Sarah Dantzer and Charmayne Carlson did not garner enough votes for a seat on council. In the previous municipal government, Joy Thorkelson was the only woman on council.

In total 2,913 ballots had been cast out of 8,727 eligible voters.

The results for the school board trustees saw Kate Toye with the most votes [1,838], followed by Bart Kuntz, Tina Last, James Horne, Kristy Maier and Louisa Sanchez.

Voter turnout was higher in 2014 when 47.6 per cent of eligible voters cast their vote, which was higher than the B.C. average of 34.5 per cent.

Prince Rupert councillor candidates

Nick Adey 1,535

Charmayne Carlson 811

Barry Cunningham [incumbent] 2,133

Sarah Dantzer 1,177

Blair Mirau [incumbent] 2,221

Wade Niesh [incumbent] 1,811

Gurvinder Randhawa [incumbent] 1,841

Reid Skelton-Morven 1,342

READ about the CANDIDATES here

WATCH MORE: Prince Rupert candidates on why you should vote for them

School board trustee candidates

David Cook 758

Al Ernst 275

Steve Finnigan 965

James Horne [incumbent] 1,235

Terri-Lynne Huddlestone [incumbent] 947

Bart Kuntz [incumbent] 1,350

Tina Last [incumbent] 1,313

Kristy Maier 1,096

Jessica Newman 918

Louisa Sanchez [incumbent] 1,086

Kate Toye 1,838

READ about the CANDIDATES here.

RELATED: District psychologists, teacher shortage discussed at school board trustee debate

Just Posted

Northwest mobile unit to help those at heart of mental health, addiction crisis

Province, Northern Health unveils new unit in Terrace to bridge gaps in services

Taylor Northcott will help build Arizona State hockey

Prince Rupert hockey star was a Seawolf before moving south for sports school

Dundas Island clams could be poisonous: health authorities

Butter clams harvested in November 2018 could cause paralytic shellfish poisoning

Uncertain future for Alaska ferry terminal in Prince Rupert

Severe budget cuts could mean ending service to the only Canadian stop on the Alaska Marine Highway

Video: Rupert cafe uses espresso machine to make “eggspresso” eggs

Owner Judson Rowse says they experimented with steam from the machine due to lack of space

Rumors to hit the Lester Centre stage this Thursday

Prince Rupert community cast and crew present Neil Simon’s two-act comedy from March 21-23

Permit rejected to bring two cheetahs to B.C.

Earl Pfeifer owns two cheetahs, one of which escaped in December 2015

Real-life tsunami threat in Port Alberni prompts evacuation updates

UBC study says some people didn’t recognize the emergency signal

Care providers call for B.C. seniors’ watchdog to step down

The association also asks the province to conduct an audit and review of the mandate of her office

Sulphur dioxide level peaks in Kitimat

Levels rise to over 60 parts per billion

Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from B.C. roaster recalled due to botulism scare

“If you purchased N7 Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from Cherry Hill … do not drink it.”

B.C. man gets award for thwarting theft, sexual assault – all in 10 minutes

Karl Dey helped the VPD take down a violent sex offender

POLL: Have you every used the Alaska ferry from Prince Rupert?

Budget cuts could mean ending service to the only Canadian stop on the Alaska Marine Highway

Nowhere to grieve: How homeless people deal with loss during the opioid crisis

Abbotsford homeless advocate says grief has distinct challenges for those living on the streets

Most Read