Do you adjust the thermostat without telling your partner?

A survey suggests 30% of Canadians admit they adjust the heat without checking with their partner

Do you ever change the thermostat without telling your partner?

Thirty per cent of Canadians admit to doing so if they’re too hot or too cold, according to a Research Co. poll released this week.

Women (35 per cent) are more likely to confess to adjusting the heat without checking than men (25 per cent), while Quebecers are the most likely in Canada (35 per cent), and British Columbians the least (8 per cent).

Nineteen per cent said they’d never make such a change without asking their partner.

About 40 per cent of Canadians said their energy and heating use at home has increased over the past few weeks, as the cold front of winter moves in.

In B.C., that number rose to 43 per cent.

READ MORE: B.C.’s natural gas supply could see 50% dip through winter due to pipeline blast

WATCH: Pipeline explosion causes evacuations near Prince George

FortisBC has asked customers to reduce their gas use after the Enbridge natural gas pipeline in Prince George ruptured in October. A dip in supply is expected to continue through the winter.

The poll also looked at exactly how warm Canadians prefer their homes.

Across the country, 9 per cent of respondents said they keep the temperature at 18 C or lower while 6 per cent said they set it to 23 C or higher. Forty per cent preferred 21 to 22 C, and 38 per cent liked 19 to 20 C.

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version said women are more likely to reveal that they change the theromostat “without permission” from their spouse.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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