Chilliwack homeowners get rainbow driveway after city rejects Pride crosswalk

Dismayed by council decision they decide to display symbol of LGBTQ2 acceptance and diversity

The freshly painted rainbow crosswalk on a private driveway in Chilliwack, B.C. spans 38 feet in length.

“To me, diversity is important.”

That’s how Chilliwack homeowner Marty van den Bosch explained in a Facebook post why he and his wife, Kristy, decided to have a brightly coloured rainbow painted on their property.

A photo of the new rainbow from last week received a whopping 750 likes and other emoji reactions, along with 131 shares.

“We have a large cross-section of people that live in our country, and in our city,” wrote van den Bosch. “Each and every one of us are different, often in many ways.”

They watched with dismay as city council quashed the rainbow crosswalk proposal in a 5-1 vote at city hall last week, he said.

Council took the vote without allowing the advocates to speak, despite a petition signed by more than 800 people, and 100 letters of support.

“I do my best to treat people based on their actions, and their words, not on things like their sexual orientation, race or any other attributes they were born with,” continued van den Bosch.

He’s not trying to change anyone’s mind, but said they felt it was important to show that the acceptance and inclusivity effort was worthy, and the rainbow advocates should have been given a chance to at least address council with hundreds of people supporting them.

“Look, I am a middle-aged and heterosexual male who has no investment in this, and at first when I heard about the effort to get a rainbow crosswalk approved, I was neither strongly for or against,” van den Bosch said.

READ MORE: Crosswalk proposal voted down by council

But he changed his view since then.

“If it wasn’t contentious, then something like this wouldn’t be needed,” van den Bosch said. “This is not about getting attention.”

READ MORE: Rainbow crosswalks painted on Sto:lo land

It comes down to respect.

“I support the belief that everyone should be treated with respect, regardless of our differences,” he said.

He offered thanks to painter Lorna Seip, manager of Two Girls On A Roll, for providing the labour to paint the crosswalk at no charge.

It didn’t cost much for the project materials, about $410 for all the supplies including paint, van den Bosch estimated.

“It can be done inexpensively,” he said about painting on private property.

Of course for a city crosswalk it would cost much more, to pay for flaggers, signage, cones and other costs.


@CHWKjourno
jfeinberg@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Just Posted

Stop checks, searches of Wet’suwet’en pipeline opposers unlawful: Watchdog

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs file complaint

Wet’suwet’en pipeline supporters speak up

“Protesters get one side of the story and they stand up with their fists in the air.”

Bachrach rejects calls for police action against demonstrators

Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP says only way out of crisis is “true nation-to-nation” talks

Coast Mountain College appoints a new president

The promotion came from within the school

Coastal GasLink pipeline investor committed to closing deal despite protests

Developer TC Energy Corp. — formerly TransCanada Corp. — is to remain the operator of the $6.6-billion pipeline

Blair says RCMP have met Wet’suwet’en conditions, calls for end to blockades

The Wet’suwet’en’s hereditary chiefs oppose the Coastal GasLink project

Health officials confirm sixth COVID-19 case in B.C.

Woman remains in isolation as Fraser Health officials investigate

Study says flu vaccine protected most people during unusual influenza season

Test-negative method was pioneered by the BC Centre for Disease Control in 2004

Saskatchewan and B.C. reach championship round at Scotties

British Columbia’s Corryn Brown locked up the last berth in Pool B

B.C. lawyer, professor look to piloting a mental-health court

In November, Nova Scotia’s mental-health court program marked 10 years of existence

COLUMN: Not an expert on First Nations government structures? Then maybe you should calm down

Consider your knowledge about First Nations governance structures before getting really, really mad

One dead in multi-vehicle collision involving logging truck on northern B.C. highway

DriveBC says highway expected to remain closed until 8 p.m.

B.C. teacher gets 15-year ban after lying about having sex with just-graduated student

Teacher had been dishonest with the B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation

Pipeline talks got B.C. railway open, can work again: Horgan

Premier says protest excesses damage Wet’suwet’en case

Most Read