MMIW

Dresses hang outside Nelson city hall as part of the REDress Project by Métis artist Jaime Black. Photo: Bill Metcalfe

B.C. red dresses symbolizing missing, murdered Indigenous women vandalized a 2nd time

Nelson’s REDress Project was vandalized along with an outdoor installation on Vancouver Island

 

Mabel Todd, 83, of the Nak’azdli First Nation, leads a group of family members and advocates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as they walk along the so-called Highway of Tears in Moricetown, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Province, feds fund full cell service along ‘Highway of Tears’ following years of advocacy

A ‘critical milestone in helping prevent future tragedies’ after at least 10 Indigenous women murdered, missing along the route

 

Sandspit resident Brenna Kowalchuk (left) and Skidegate resident Zoey Collinson each ran 10 kilometres on Saturday, June 13, 2020 as part of the Tears to Hope Virtual Relay to raise awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, including Kowalchuk’s niece Chantel Moore. (Facebook photos)

Aunt of Chantel Moore runs virtual relay on Haida Gwaii for MMIWG

Brenna Kowalchuk was also inspired by another Haida Gwaii woman who ran for MMIWG, Zoey Collinson

 

Jacquie Bowes, an organizer with the event, speaks at Bovill Square on June 1. (Trevor Hewitt photo)

Family, friends of Jessica Patrick demand answers after another death along Highway of Tears, Smithers

Gathering places memorial near where the 18-year-old’s body was found in September 2018

Jacquie Bowes, an organizer with the event, speaks at Bovill Square on June 1. (Trevor Hewitt photo)
A memory stone was placed high up along a bank by Highway 16, east of Prince Rupert, where Tamara Lynn Chipman went missing. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

IN OUR OPINION: A walk to remember

Keeping memories alive of Tamara Chipman and others who went missing on Highway 16

A memory stone was placed high up along a bank by Highway 16, east of Prince Rupert, where Tamara Lynn Chipman went missing. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)
The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is holding hearings in communities along Highway 16, also known as “The Highway of Tears” in northwest B.C. (Photo by Izithombe on Flickr)                                The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is holding hearings in communities along Highway 16, also known as “The Highway of Tears” in northwest B.C. (Photo by Izithombe on Flickr)

Short notice for MMIW inquiry community meetings

Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous comes to northern B.C.

  • Jul 20, 2017
The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is holding hearings in communities along Highway 16, also known as “The Highway of Tears” in northwest B.C. (Photo by Izithombe on Flickr)                                The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is holding hearings in communities along Highway 16, also known as “The Highway of Tears” in northwest B.C. (Photo by Izithombe on Flickr)
A memorial cross was erected to commemorate the life and death of Alberta Williams near the place her body was found, west of the Tyee overpass.

North Coast reaction to commissioner for missing and murdered Indigenous women inquiry resignation.

Indigenous Mothers group says a more co-managed grassroots approach must be taken moving forward

  • Jul 15, 2017
A memorial cross was erected to commemorate the life and death of Alberta Williams near the place her body was found, west of the Tyee overpass.
National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Chief Commissioner, Marion Buller pauses during an interview with The Canadian Press, in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday August 31, 2016. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

Head of MMIW inquiry says she understands frustrations over hearing delays

The commission is set to hold its first public hearing May 29 in Whitehorse

National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Chief Commissioner, Marion Buller pauses during an interview with The Canadian Press, in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday August 31, 2016. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)