Marc Page

VIDEO and Story – Giving youth a board: MVP of the Week, Marc Page

Marc Page gives back by putting on free snowboarding and skateboarding competitions for Prince Rupert youth.



Prince Rupert abounds with individuals eager to help its community and give back any way they can, and maybe that’s why Marc Page has never left the city he was born in.

Page, who has owned and operated Loaded Sports since 2004, has taken the responsibility of giving back to kids in the sports community the way he knows how — by hosting free skateboarding and snowboarding competitions every year.

“Being a snowboard store, I always felt since I was making profits off of the snowboarding and skateboarding industry, I should be finding ways to give back as well,” Page said.

The way he sees it, giving Rupert youth the opportunity to participate in healthy activities, either rich or poor, gives the kids confidence, goals and a chance for a better path.

That’s not to say all youths go down bad paths, but Page can only speak from experience and snowboarding was a better way for him, so he figures it could be for the kids, too.

“I look for a fun way for these kids to compete and achieve their goals, whether it’s a new trick or winning a contest. Any kid that achieves their goal will get more pride in themselves and more confidence. Being a proud and confident person will allow you to get further in life,” he said.

When Page was younger, he would often have only $20 in his pocket when he was on the ski hill and had to choose between competing or eating.

“I always chose eating,” he said with a chuckle.

That’s why he doesn’t charge for his events. Money shouldn’t exclude snowboarders from competition, Page said.

The events started 13 years ago when he was helping out at his mom’s clothing store. A local skateboarder approached him and asked for help coming up with prizes for a skateboarding event he was putting on. But he never ended up holding the contest and Page was left with a bunch of prizes, so he decided to host the competition himself.

Once the contest was over, he thought “this isn’t so hard, I might as well open up a store.”

So he did, and Loaded Sports was born two months later in Nov. 2004. The first snowboarding event was held in 2006 — it was tougher figuring out the logistics of that one since it wasn’t in town.

But Page’s contributions to Rupert’s sports community go even further back than that. Growing up, he never really fixed on any specific sport until he hit high school. When he failed to make the A basketball team, he signed up for wrestling rather than join the B basketball team.

“I competed there for a long time and then coached the (wrestling) team for nine years after graduating. After getting into business, I didn’t really have time to coach anymore so I just took on other ways I could give back, like holding events,” Page said.

It was also in high school that the 39-year-old fell in love with snowboarding and it set him on a path from which he would never leave.

“I’m addicted to snowboarding. I’ve built my life around it,” he said.

Snowboarding — and also skateboarding, to some extent — give him an adrenaline fix, whether it’s going really fast on something you could potentially wipe out on, or trying new tricks.

And he has indeed built his life around it. Back in 2004, when he realized he could combine his passion for snowboarding with his career, he was quick to make that decision and he’s never looked back.

“It was a great feeling to know that I could run a board shop and I could run a business off of something that I love,” Page said.

The love of snowboarding has never left. On Monday, he took to the slopes of Shames Mountain for the 29th day this season, one shy of what’s always a goal of his: 30 snowboarding days a season. It’s those 30 days every winter that make up for the tough times in other parts of the year.

“If I get 30 days of snowboarding a season, when I come across a stressful time throughout the year, I just think back to my 30 days. I think, ‘you know what, I had a good season, or I’ve got one coming.’ You’ve got to think positive,” he said.

Whether it’s feeding into his love of the sport, keeping his business successful or helping the youth of Prince Rupert tap into that passion and enjoy snowboarding and skateboarding, one thing is sure: snowboarding has become Page’s life, and by the looks of it, he wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

Just Posted

Australian gold mining giant acquires Red Chris mine

Newcrest now owns 70 per cent of the mine south of Iskut and operatorship

Haida Gwaii storm causes B.C. ferry delay

Skidegate to Prince Rupert route affected

Prince Rupert Rampage 2019-20 season schedule released

Trio of games against Terrace River Kings plus showdowns against new teams highlight the season

Council briefs: Gurney marks one year as Lester Centre’s manager, marina revenues down

Council supports Métis Awareness week but has concern over raising Infinity Flag

In-brief: Electric charging station available in Prince Rupert, Metlakatla senior housing taking applications

Weather dampens paving plans on McBride, The Northern View Cannery Road Race is coming down the road

Captain, all-star, MVP, and all about the team

Brittanne O’Connor’s drive to create Prince Rupert’s own women’s team has led to success and inspiration

The Northern View announces inaugural Tyee Fishing Derby in Prince Rupert

More than $7,000 up for grabs for biggest legal salmon and halibut

The Northern View 2019 Readers Choice

It’s that time of year again! Vote online or at the Prince Rupert office before noon on Aug. 30

B.C. cricket players get interrupted by racist remark

Community has had protocols in place for years to respond to prejudice

Groovy B.C. wedding a throwback to Woodstock ‘69

Couple hosts themed wedding 50 years after legendary festival

Nearly 50% of Canadians experience the ‘post-vacation blues’: poll

48 per cent of travellers are already stressed about ‘normal life’ while still on their trip

Couple could go to jail for taking 88 lbs. of Italian sand

Pair said they didn’t know it was illegal to take the sand, which is protected as a public good

Most Read