Brad Firth, also known as Caribou Legs, speaks to a young person at Prince Rupert Friendship House. (Matthew Allen / The Northern View)

Caribou Legs runs 700km to Prince Rupert

A long-distance runner has been raising awareness about the Highway of Tears for the last 21 days

After a journey that lasted 21 days, Brad “Caribou Legs” Firth arrived in Prince Rupert after running more than 700 kilometres to raise awareness about the Highway of Tears.

Firth, who is a member of the Gwich’in First Nation, began his journey in Prince George on Nov. 1. Firth burned sweetgrass as he ran to cleanse the highway and stopped in several communities along the way to speak to Indigenous youths. He said that his reception has been mixed, but for most part the response he has received for what he has tried to accomplish has been positive.

READ MORE: Walking the Highway of Tears for a woman who went missing 12 years ago from Prince Rupert

“A lot of people have been coming out and supporting us with gas money, supporting us with food and hugs and honks on the road,” he said. “In its inaugural run, I’m pleased and satisfied with the outcome.”

Firth arrived in Prince Rupert on Nov. 21 and met with approximately 17 young people aged 13-17 at the Prince Rupert Friendship House. He offered them encouragement, told them to support one another and to spend more time connecting with each other and learning about their history instead of playing video games.

“I want you to be routed in your culture,” he said. “If you spend too much of your time with your PlayStation or Xbox, prepare to be isolated.”

RCMP have reported that 18 girls or women have gone missing or been murdered along the highway between Prince George and Prince Rupert since 1969. Those in the Indigenous community say the number is closer to 50. Eric Klaptiuk, a coordinator at the Friendship House, said conversations like the one Firth had are important.

“It’s not one that happens and it should be happening more often especially in light of a lot of things that are happening not only in Canada but globally,” he said.



matthew.allen@thenorthernview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Prince Rupert fights to the top of the podium

Dan Wong and Inderpol Bagri bring home the gold at martial arts tournament

Port Ed council chambers full over campground dispute

Port Edward council puts decision to fund Lester Centre on hold

Prince Rupert 2030 Vision ready to be shared with the public

Redesign Rupert is unveiling their plan for the city

Q&A with Lax Kw’alaams Mayor John Helin

Helin spoke about topics in his community ahead of the village’s upcoming election

Ottawa urges CN and union to continue talks as 3,200 workers go on strike

The rail workers began their strike after failing to reach a deal by a midnight deadline

In Our Opinion: This is why shopping Rupert First matters

Shop in Prince Rupert before you go online

Your Prince Rupert 55th Rotary Auction guide

Online guide to all the items up for bid before Monday’s live auction

Distracted driving tickets not for ICBC revenue, B.C. minister says

Minister Mike Farnworth calls SenseBC analysis ‘nonsense’

CN Rail strike and lack of trucking alternatives stoke forest industry fears

Companies calling on the federal government to ‘do everything in its power’ to end the strike

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveils new Liberal cabinet

Pivotal role in his new cabinet for a minority-government era goes to Chrystia Freeland

B.C. mom, kids on bike turned away from Tim Hortons drive-thru

Car-free for years, Charity Millar ‘felt gross’ being denied service

B.C. woman puts call out for 10,000 personal, heartfelt Christmas cards for the homeless

Christmas Card Collective enters into third year of making spirits bright

No turn signals, double-parking among top concerns for B.C. drivers: poll

Two-thirds of B.C. drivers said that not using turn signals was their biggest pet peeve

Most Read