Former Canadian No.1 Aleksandra Wozniak fights back tears as she announces her retirement from professional tennis after a 13 year career at a news conference Wednesday, December 19, 2018 in Montreal. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)

Former Canadian No.1 Aleksandra Wozniak fights back tears as she announces her retirement from professional tennis after a 13 year career at a news conference Wednesday, December 19, 2018 in Montreal. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)

Canadian tennis player Wozniak retires following injury-plagued 2018 season

Wozniak picked up the sport at the age of three, taking after her little sister

Following a 2018 season that saw her participate in just three events and a crowdfunding campaign for financial support fall short, Canadian tennis star Aleksandra Wozniak spent some time with her family in Poland.

Not longer after the trip, which included a visit with her 94-year old grandmother, she began considering retirement.

“I had some great times with her and my family,” Wozniak said. “That’s when I started thinking about it and how my body can’t play a high level of tennis forever. I’ve spent 28 years of my life playing.”

The 31-year old announced her retirement in a press conference at Stade IGA in Montreal on Wednesday morning, saying that her body was no longer capable of competing at a high level.

“It’s very difficult to make that decision but you have to listen to your health,” Wozniak said. “I love my sport. It’s been my passion since I was a little girl so it hasn’t been easy.”

The announcement ends a once promising career that saw her reach No. 21 in the World Tennis Association rankings and play an instrumental role with Canada’s Fed Cup team before injuries took their toll.

Wozniak picked up the sport at the age of three, taking after her little sister. She had to beg her initially reluctant father to be her first coach.

Following success on the junior circuit, she carved out an accomplished pro career. The Montreal native is the first Quebec-born tennis player to win a Women’s Tennis Association title, capturing the 2008 Stanford Classic in a win over France’s Marion Bartoli.

“I played eight matches in nine days,” said Wozniak, who calls Blainville, Que., home. “I won against top 10 players, Serena Williams, Bartoli, many others.”

Wozniak also won 11 titles on the lower-tier International Tennis Federation circuit and represented Canada at the 2012 Olympic Games in London in singles and doubles play.

But 2009 will be seen as her banner year in the sport. She reached the fourth round of the French Open in singles play, as well as the quarterfinals of the Australian Open. That summer, Wozniak reached her career-high No. 21 world ranking, and she capped her year with the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as the Canadian female athlete of the year.

The tennis star listed a number of her individual accomplishments, but was also proud of her success in team events. She holds the Canadian record for most Fed Cup wins with 40 and most ties played with 36.

“Tennis is an individual sport, but when you’re on a team you have the team spirit and you want to support one another,” Wozniak said. “Those were some great moments I went through. Every game I got to play for my country, hurt or not hurt. When I stepped out on the court, I knew my country was behind me.”

A right shoulder injury that forced Wozniak to step away from the game for an 11-month period between 2014 and 2015. She never regained the form she had in 2009, but she still found some success on the ITF circuit.

Wozniak was also battling a knee injury this year, on top of limited action and a crowdfunding campaign on GoFundMe.com with a goal of $50,000. The campaign fell short.

“When I hurt my knee and I needed some time, I visited a doctor and everything,” Wozniak said. “That’s when I realized how hard it is on the body. One day I want my own family and I want to be in good health.”

Wozniak says she’ll be involved in a tennis tournament for student-athletes across Quebec starting in January and she also hopes to start her own tennis academy in retirement.

“I’ve loved kids for years. I always try to be close to them,” Wozniak said. “But I’m open to a lot of different opportunities over the next few months.”

Julian McKenzie, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Pink shirt day was celebrated at Pineridge Elementary School by staff and students in a stand against bullying. Mr. Craig, a work-experience student from Charle Hays Secondary School is seen with students in front of the hearts for kindness board on Feb. 24. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Pineridge students stand against bullying

Prince Rupert students in the pink with kindness

A Prince Rupert neighbourhood on Feb. 23, showing various housing with an apartment building development in the background. Housing advocates in the city say affordable housing is scarce.(Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Prince Rupert Recruitment campaign creates housing availability debate

“There is a serious disconnect here, with the new recruitment campaign,” - Paul Lagace

FILE – A COVID-19 vaccine being prepared. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
B.C. seniors 80 years and older to get COVID vaccine details over next 2 weeks: Henry

Province is expanding vaccine workforce as officials ramp up age-based rollout

The City of Prince Rupert has received $1 million in provincial funding to assist redevelopment of the waterfront and support the Prince Rupert Waterfront Airport Ferry Landing development project. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
City to receive part of $20 million for waterfront development

Funding will support the Prince Rupert airport ferry relocation project

B.C. health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and health minister Adrian Dix wore pink shirts to showcase this year’s motto: “Lift each other up.” (Twitter/PinkShirtDay)
PHOTOS: B.C. celebs take a stand against bullying on Pink Shirt Day

‘We need to let young people know they are not alone and they can reach out to others for help’

(Black Press Media file photo)
B.C. residents can reserve provincial camp sites starting March 8

B.C. residents get priority access to camping reservations in province

Two women were arrested in Nanaimo for refusing to wear masks and causing disturbance on a BC Ferries vessel. (File photo)
B.C. ferry passengers arrested and fined for disturbance, refusing to wear masks

Police said woman threatened their pensions in Feb. 21 incident aboard Nanaimo-bound boat

When his owner had knee surgery, Kevin, 2, was able to continue to go for walks thanks to volunteers from Elder Dog Canada. (Contributed photo)
B.C. woman has nothing but praise for Elder Dog Canada

National organization has a fleet of volunteer walkers ready, but needs more clients to serve

Justin Morissette is still recovering from the injuries sustained in the altercation. He is not yet able to walk without assistance. (Justin Morissette, Twitter)
B.C. man suing city and police over violent altercation with anti-LGBTQ preacher

Justin Morissette argues police knew the threat the preacher posed, and failed to keep the peace

Mowi Canada West salmon farm in B.C. waters. Conservative MPs have backed an industry call for further discussions on the timeline for closing Discovery Island farms. (Photo supplied by Mowi Canada)
Conservative MPs back B.C. salmon farmers’ call for transparent discussions

Farm owners requested consultations, more time to leave Discovery Islands

Jack Barnes, who was Cowichan Valley Capitals property from May 2020 until last week, scores a goal for the Penticton Vees during the 2019-20 BCHL season. (Brennan Phillips/Black Press)
COVID-crunched BCHL facing trade deadline dilemma with its 20-year-olds

Hard decisions loom when BCHL may or may not resume play

UBC Okanagan students are among the most food insecure in Canada, according to a new study by UBC.
(Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
UBC Okanagan students among most food insecure in Canada

42.3 per cent either can’t properly feed themselves, or are worried they will soon run out of money

Most Read