Children and adults both dared to cross the pond on their skis at the annual Slush Cup on the last day Shames Mountain was open for the season

A solid season for Shames

Shames Mountain had a fantastic season this year, opening nearly a week early and with no closures due to weather.

Shames Mountain had a fantastic season this year, opening nearly a week early and with no closures due to weather.

“It’s one of the rare seasons where we managed to open the hill early, meet our closing date, and not have any days where we were forced to close,” said manager Christian Théberge.

The downhill skiing and snowboard season on Shames Mountain wrapped up April 1-3 with a fire, hot dogs and smores on Friday, the Loaded Throwdown on Saturday and the annual Slush Cup on Sunday, April 3.

With the extra open days this last winter season, Théberge said bus transportation doubled and they sold more day passes. He estimates there were 2,000 more visits to the hill than the average 20,000, though the official tally will not be completed until June.

As for weather, Théberge said it was a slow year, with 20-centimetres reported only three times in the season, compared to the average 4-5 times per month.

“It was certainly a very low snow year, but we did not get very much rain,” he said.

But the enjoyment on the hill is also due in part to the enthusiasm of the people, said Tim Martin, one of the regulars who said this past season was amazing.

“Even the days when there wasn’t as much fresh snow, or it hadn’t snowed in a while, just the vibe up there, the friendly people, familiar faces, welcoming attitude was fantastic,” Martin said.

The school program at Shames Mountain was at capacity this year, with the hill needing more instructors and gear if they want to expand it — “a good problem to have,” Théberge said.

Looking ahead to this summer, My Mountain Co-op is installing a new heat recovery system to reduce emissions and cut future costs at Shames Mountain.

The chair lift is powered by a diesel generator since the mountain is off the grid, and this new system will harness the heat from the generator and use it in a wood boiler system to heat the lodge.

“We are hoping to reduce our diesel consumption by 20 percent,” Théberge said of their goal.

The project is estimated at $60,000, with $30,000 from Terrace Community Forests, and Théberge said most of the rest will be volunteer labour and donations.

He adds that some people have already been approaching him wanting to help because they find the project interesting and valuable.

He expects volunteers will do a minimum of two thirds of the work, which includes some electrical, mechanical and machinery work, as well as some digging and trenching for the wiring.

“What makes things possible is that we have a strong volunteer force and a strong contingent from the community that cares about the mountain and the project,” he said.

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