Simply, there are just no excuses

We have just two things to do — the rest can wait.

We have just two things to do — the rest can wait.

Most, if not all, of us lead lives that are dominated with duties, obligations, responsibilities and pastimes that challenge the 24 hours we are given each day.

Work, family, school, cleaning the gutters, feeding the dog, et. al., the list of things we need to get done on any given day seems to consume our lives, and the thought of a day off to do nothing, to decompress, is appealing to all of us.

So, next Tuesday, go ahead, take the day off — well, take 22 hours.

For 22 of those 24 hours, go ahead, put your feet up, relax and do whatever it is you enjoy — you deserve it.

However, for a couple of hours next Tuesday, Nov. 11,  show your respect to those who made it possible for you to live the busy life you have chosen to lead.

Although there are some essential service workers who will be working on our national holiday and others too ill, for the rest of us, on Remembrance Day, there is no justifiable excuse for not making your way down to the Prince Rupert cenotaph by 11 a.m.

Turnout on Remembrance Day in Prince Rupert has, in my experience, been heartening.

Babies to near-centenarians are there. Able-bodied men and women from all races and cultures are there. Men and women on canes and in wheelchairs are there. Uniformed personnel and civilians are there. They are there to honour those who did their duty, some who paid the ultimate price, and to show the necessary respect for those who made no excuses.

Other than those too ill or providing an essential service, every person in this community should be at the service.

Any other reason for not attending is just an excuse that cannot be excused.

Four days later comes one of the rewards earned by that duty, sacrifice and blood — a democratic election.

Some would argue that it is a right not to cast a vote. For whatever reason, whether personal or political, some want to do their civic duty but just can’t hold their nose long enough to make their mark on a ballot. Fair enough.

If that is your reason for not wanting to vote, then do so by showing up at the polling station, registering and cast a blank ballot that will be rejected. You’ve done your duty and exercised your democratic right.

For all others eligible to vote, not voting is inexcusable.

There are advance polls, special polls, even mobile voting opportunities for those who are too ill, or for those who find the general election day is inconvenient.

Then there are those who say their vote just doesn’t matter. These people, above all, need to be at the cenotaph on Tuesday.

I’d ask them then to read all the names on the cenotaphs across this great nation and then look into the eyes of those who have or are serving and tell them that what they have done in service to this country didn’t matter.

Anyway you want to look at it, not attending or not voting is just a disrespectful and poor excuse.

After all the sacrifice and service, the very least you can do are these two simple things, the rest can wait.

Just Posted

Joie de vivre

Finding those “awe” moments with family, friends and food

Christians unite for one service in Rupert

Father Terry Brock is hoping to unite all of Prince Rupert’s Christians under one roof for one night

VIDEO: New whale rescue equipment comes to Rupert

Fisheries officers took to the water to practice saving stranded whales

Streeter: Do you think it’s important that the government holds discussions about poverty with the public?

Prince Rupert hosted the first public discussion on poverty by the province in 2018

Rupert recreation parking rent fees set to decrease in 2018

Proposed changes will make it easier for vendors and renters to use recreation facilities

This Week Episode 68

From inside the Northern View office in Prince Rupert we bring you all the news headlines

Carriers wanted for the Northern View

We have open routes for carriers all over Prince Rupert

VIDEO: Thousands join women’s march events across B.C.

Today marks one year since the first Women’s March on Washington

Two Canadians, two Americans abducted in Nigeria are freed

Kidnapping for ransom is common in Nigeria, especially on the Kaduna to Abuja highway

Are you ready for some wrestling? WWE’s ‘Raw’ marks 25 years

WWE flagship show is set to mark its 25th anniversary on Monday

B.C. woman who forged husband’s will gets house arrest

Princeton Judge says Odelle Simmons did not benefit from her crime

Women’s movement has come a long way since march on Washington: Activists

Vancouver one of several cities hosting event on anniversary of historic Women’s March on Washington

Liberals’ 2-year infrastructure plan set to take 5: documents

Government says 793 projects totalling $1.8 billion in federal funds have been granted extensions

Workers shouldn’t be used as ‘pawns’ in minimum wage fight: Wynne

Comments from Kathleen Wynne after demonstrators rallied outside Tim Hortons locations across Canada

Most Read