Kitson Island on the North Coast of B.C. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

COLUMN: Move over DiCaprio, we found the beach

A bit of adventure to find the perfect beach near Lelu Island, Port Edward

When people ask me why I live on the North Coast I usually boast about the mountains, ocean views and the endless outdoor fun you can have, but never have I thought to include a beach in that list.

Until this past weekend.

Before moving to Prince Rupert, I’d travelled on and off around the world. Much of that time was spent looking for the ideal beach. For my generation, Alex Garland’s The Beach, published in 1996, etched a permanent ink blot in many traveller’s mental to-do list.

Then Leo DiCaprio, as the protagonist Richard, made it come to life on the big screen and I was determined to find my own.

I remember my parents telling me after watching Hollywood’s rendition of The Beach that it reminded them of life in Tasu on Haida Gwaii in the early ‘80s. I’m not going to lie, when I found out I was moving to Prince Rupert, I hoped it had a similar vibe.

I heard a rumour a while ago that there is a sandy beach nearby — but like most treasures on the North Coast you have to work for it. With clear skies this past weekend, my partner and I decided to take the kayaks out to explore.

RELATED: Kayaking down the Skeena during the eulachon run

We started from the boat launch in Port Edward, paddled past the many ‘No LNG’ signs on Lelu Island, and waved to fish harvesters and sport anglers alike as they passed by. Harbour porpoises breached near our kayaks, and the water was so clear we could see the sea floor, or Flora Bank, all the way from Lelu to Kitson Island, where a recently cancelled LNG project planned to build a one-kilometre bridge.

After an hour of paddling, we found a sandy beach.

It was small, and still faced the industrial coastline of Ridley Island. But through a path to the other side we found paradise.

Too good to be true, we returned the next day for more beach and found other families there saying the same thing, that they had found paradise. For some, they had been there before but it had been years, too long. For others, it was their first time.

For me, it reminded me of why I live here. It’s the kind of paradise that isn’t necessarily where you go, but how you feel for a moment in your life when you’re a part of something — much like how Richard felt in the book.

WATCH MORE: Kayaking to daffodils on Dodge Cove

 

shannon.lough@thenorthernview.com 

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter 

Experience Prince Rupert

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Necropsy for Port Edward wolf is inconclusive

Samples sent for forensic analysis; wolf sightings continue

Seafest parade sails on June 27

Tides are turning during COVID-19 for Prince Rupert parade

Prince Rupert school district fires superintendent

Dr. Irene LaPierre removed from position immediately.

B.C. government eyes antlerless moose harvest increase in bid to save caribou

Antlerless moose hunts reduce predation for threatened mountain caribou, says ministry

Wolf killed in Port Edward

Samples to be sent to lab. for testing

March dental conference key to many of B.C.’s COVID-19 cases

Early infections from China, Iran were quickly contained

MAP: Dr. Henry reveals which B.C. regions have seen most COVID-19 cases

B.C. health officials release a first look at how the novel coronavirus has reached all corners of the province

Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation woman, 26, fatally shot by police in Edmundston, N.B.

Police were conducting a well-being check at the time of the incident

Seniors to receive up to $500 in promised COVID-19 emergency aid in early July

The Liberal government first promised the extra help in mid-May, but had to create a new system to deliver the aid

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

VIDEO: Revelstoke bear wanders into Animal House pet store

Staff got ready to chase it out with a broom

New study is first full list of species that only exist in Canada

Almost 40 per cent of them are critically imperilled or imperilled and eight are already extinct

Federal aid for care home systems needed ahead of second wave, advocates say

Ontario Long Term Care Association calling for more action

Most Read