B.C. resident hunters must be priority

The B.C. Guide Outfitting industry and their foreign trophy hunting clients have become the subject of much controversy.

Editor:

The B.C. Guide Outfitting industry, that harvest wildlife for profit, and their foreign trophy hunting clients have become the subject of much controversy amongst the resident hunting community throughout B.C. and the B.C.Wildlife Federation.

At the heart of the issue is the Guide Outfitters Association of B.C. (GOABC) lobbying Minister of Forests, Land and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO) Steve Thomson and Premier Christy Clark to remove more wildlife harvest allocations from 100,000 resident hunter to 210 Guide Outfitters throughout B.C. Ultimately the GOABC is asking that Government hand over substantially more B.C. resident wildlife allocations to guide outfitters.

What does this mean for resident hunters? Much less opportunity to fill your freezers with organic meat, increased odds on Limited Entry, and less opportunity for resident hunters to hunt overall. This in an effort by the GOAB.C.to prop up commercial trophy hunting primarily for foreigners, at the expense of B.C. residents.

Other North American jurisdictions allow commercial hunting interests 10 per cent or less of allocated species. Here in B.C., guide outfitters have successfully lobbied the Minister to allocate up to 40 per cent of allocated wildlife species.

Independent Guide Outfitters and the GOAB.C.have argued the economic benefits of the trophy hunting business. However, recent economic reports reveal that resident hunters contribute far more to the B.C. economy through the many businesses supporting their outdoor recreation, hunting for food, and wildlife conservation. With these findings it makes no sense economically, and in the interest of wildlife to shift hunting allocations away from resident hunters to that of foreign trophy hunters.

Resident hunting spans generations having a strong heritage, traditional, social and cultural foundation. Family and friendship bonds are fostered and nurtured through our revered hunting opportunities, and many cherished memories created last lifetimes.

We fear that the minister of FLNRO and the Premier may not recognize or fail to better entrench these very important family values of B.C. residents, and cater to the GOAB.C.and their trophy hunting for profit business agenda. By coincidence, the GOAB.C.and a number of guide outfitters contributed to the Liberal Party in the last provincial election.

It is our perspective that after conservation and First Nations food, social and ceremonial needs, that the needs of B.C. residents be met over that of foreign hunting interests.

We must ask government decision makers if they will allow 210 guide outfitters and the GOAB.C.to trump the social values, economic contribution, and hunt for food opportunity of 100,000 resident hunting families?

If the minister and Premier truly support B.C.’s 100,000 resident hunting families, then the now vitiated 2007 allocation policy needs to be rescinded, allocated wildlife spits legislated, and immediately set to 90 per cent residents and 10 per cent guide outfitters for all species as is done in other jurisdictions. Does the Province support 100,000 B.C. resident hunting families or that of 210 guide outfitters catering to foreign trophy hunters?

The minister’s decision will tell and we are anxiously awaiting it.

Mike Langegger

Northwest Fish and Wildlife Conservation Association – Chairman

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Aimed at success – the launch hit the target

Prince Rupert teen Brendan Eshom launches educational software app that hits Apple’s “Top Charts”

Getting a head for cancer research

Prince Rupert Cops for Cancer want to flush away the illness with loads of donations for research

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Four air ambulance flights out of Terrace delayed or cancelled

Pandemic precautions caused nighttime closure of service station providing weather data to pilots

Skeena Resources, Tahltan prez excited by purchase of Eskay Creek

Skeena gets full control of mine, Barrick gets 12 per cent of Skeena and a one per cent royalty

Recent surge in COVID-19 cases not unexpected amid Phase Three of reopening: B.C.’s top doc

Keep circles small, wear masks and be aware of symptoms, Dr. Bonnie Henry says

B.C. NDP changing WorkSafeBC regulations to respond to COVID-19

Employers say reclassifying coronavirus could be ‘ruinous’

Baby raccoon rescued from 10-foot deep drainage pipe on Vancouver Island

‘Its cries were loud, pitiful and heartbreaking,’ Saanich animal control officer says

Statistical flaws led to B.C. wolf cull which didn’t save endangered caribou as estimated

Study finds statistical flaws in an influential 2019 report supporting a wolf cull

Windows broken, racist graffiti left on Okanagan home

Family says nothing like this has happened since they moved to Summerland in 1980s

B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’ charged with sex assault of teenage boys

The man, 75, is accused of assaulting teenage boys he met through Coquitlam-area churches

B.C.’s potential deficit $12.5 billion as spending spikes, taxes drop

Finance Minister Carole James gives COVID-19 outlook

Canadians torn on scaling back COVID-19 benefits to save money: poll

Of those surveyed, 78 per cent said they were worried about the size of the deficit

‘Trauma equals addiction’: Why some seek solace in illicit drugs

Part 2: Many pushed into addiction by ‘toxic stress,’ says White Rock psychologist

Most Read