VIDEO: Visit Royal BC Museum’s rare fish, explore how ‘citizen science’ advances research

VIDEO: Visit Royal BC Museum’s rare fish, explore how ‘citizen science’ advances research

Porcupine fish, trigger fish, louvar and more found by British Columbians

Reaching excitedly into a water-filled container, Gavin Hanke, the Royal BC Museum’s curator of vertebrate zoology, carefully removes the body of poisonous porcupine fish and holds it proudly, water dripping from its razor-sharp quills.

Discovered for the first time in Canada on a Vancouver Island beach Oct. 5 – east of Jordan River – the sharp-spined fish has become an unlikely celebrity, wowing biologists, zoologists and the public with its unusual visit to the West Coast. The fish are normally found in temperate or tropical waters.

“It’s basically a puffer fish,” Hanke says. “They have tetrodotoxin so… you don’t want to eat one unless a licensed chef has prepared it.” Of the genus ‘diadon,’ the fish has a moveable spine and distinguishable mouth, it’s fused teeth give it the appearance of having a parrot’s beak in place of the simpler, pointed choppers found in most fish jaws.

READ ALSO: Hundreds of foreign species still washing up on B.C. coast, eight years after tsunami

The porcupine fish’s appearance on the West Coast – and reports of a second located on the same beach – is something Hanke chalks up to a “warm blob,” a surprisingly well-used term in the oceanography world for warm plumes of water that extend into typically colder zones. The ‘blobs’ are to thank for a number of rare specimens in the museum’s collection – in 2014 two surprising visitors – a trigger fish and a louvar – were discovered on Vancouver Island beaches.

To Hanke, these discoveries indicate that more non-native fish could be on their way to B.C. waters.

“We had one [warm blob] that ended in 2015 and now we have another … so if this is becoming the new norm, we could see a real change in diversity,” he says. “If it comes up two degrees, three degrees, this [porcupine fish] can survive here. It’s only a matter of time before populations get established.”

A porcupine fish discovered washed up near the Jordan River mouth likely moved north in a “warm blob” of water from its normal habitat of shallow temperate and tropical seas. Now the fish specimen is in the hands of the Royal BC Museum where it will be catalogued and preserved. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

And Hanke says the public, or ‘citizen scientists’ play a large part in tracking species. Even without a body, a picture, date and location of a discovered fish can be significant.

“There’s all kinds of other fish, shallow-water species that could easily make it north to us. It’s a matter of people finding them – someone going fishing and going ‘what is this?’” he says. “These fish weren’t found by scientists, they were found by every day people in B.C.

“So that’s a huge contribution. They have their eyes on the beach, cause I can’t be everywhere.”

Stepping further into the back rooms of the Royal BC Museum brings you face to face with an assortment of wild and wonderful critters – Canadian geese and pheasants stacked among shelves of regional fowl, a bright-eyed caribou draped in a utility blanket. In one room, rows and rows of jars filled with fish specimens line metal shelving more than ten feet high.

In the larger fish and shark storage room, Hanke puts on elbow-length rubber gloves to pulls the 2014 louvar and trigger fish from formaldehyde-filled vats, showing off their perfectly preserved fins and armor-like scales. The only thing missing is colour – the specimens seem to take on some of the rusted, stomach-churning orange of their formaldehyde environment.

The vat containing a Mako shark, brought into the museum last year, is cloudier. It’s filled with oil from the shark’s liver. The formaldehyde in the shark vats, says Hanke, has to be replaced more regularly as a result.

READ ALSO: New photos help identify mystery creature found on Peninsula beach

Hanke’s love for marine vertebrate started outside a Bristol pet store, where as a child, he watched a zebra cichlid swim the lengths of its tank. Fishtailing from an early career in pet trading to an extensive education in zoology, invasive species and a PhD in evolutionary biology, he now finds himself one of the region’s authorities on unusual fish.

A trigger fish found on the west coast of Vancouver Island in 2014 is one of many rare finds preserved at the Royal BC Museum. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

On a day to day basis Hanke could be studying anything from snail fish and cusk eels to Mola Mola and the aptly named ‘spiney eared assfish’ – a specimen that made headlines as much for its name as for its less than attractive appearance.

But he says it’s the the intertidal species and the unexciting, bottom-of the-food chain prey of B.C.’s sport fish that can really help identify climate change and habitat destruction.

One example is pricklebacks, a common intertidal fish.

“I figure when climate change hits us, it’s going to be the inter-tidal that gets hit the hardest because it will either warm up a lot more or dry out for longer [or] it might be wet and rainy,” he says. “Whatever extreme happens, it’s going to hit the inter-tidal really hard. A fish like this might be our first indicator.”

READ ALSO: Wildlife photography, orca exhibit coming soon to Victoria’s Royal BC Museum

The vast majority of the Royal BC Museum’s scaled specimens will never go on display for the public’s viewing, but as Hanke’s research proves, that’s only one aspect of the museum’s function.

“You’ve chemical signatures, DNA, presence and geography of the species present here in B.C. going back a hundred years or more,” he says. “They tell us what was here in the past [and] what’s here now and that allows us to detect change.

“The museum, in a sense, is a time machine.”



nina.grossman@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

It doesn’t matter where or how you received a COVID-19 vaccination, to receive the second immunization everyone must register on the ‘Get Vaccinated’ system health officials said, on May 11. While numbers are down Prince Rupert has not yet ‘zero’ cases as of numbers reported for May 2nd to 8th. (Image: BCCDC)
Prince Rupert still not at ‘zero’ COVID-19 cases

For second immunizations everyone in Prince Rupert and region must register, health officials said

Food programs such as the BC Fruit and Veggies program are important to student learning and students would be at a loss without them, Jeremy Janz principal of Pacific Coast School said, on May 13. Full tummies are the best way to start the day for Prince Rupert students, Natalia White (11) and Nikisha Johnson (12) who attended the official launch of the Breakfast Club of Canada program at PRMS on Feb. 25, 2020. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
School fruits and veggies may be cut, said BC Liberals

P.R. students healthy food knowledge grew from the BC School Fruit and Vegetable Nutritional program

Gabriel Bureau president of the Prince Rupert Teachers union said on May 13 that SD 52 52 announced teacher lay-offs has broken the trust. (Photo:K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Teacher job losses are unnecessary, lay-off notices may be issued today, says PRDTU

Prince Rupert District Teachers Union says trust has been broken

Courtnay Girbav has been creating a little magic along the McClymont Trail in April with the initiation of a memorial fairy garden. The garden’s golden Buddha was recently found to be missing on May 2. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Fairy garden magic along McClymont Trail

An enchanted garden created in memory of a deceased friend has golden statue stolen

Prince Rupert Regional Airport is on track for flights to resume to the local airport on June 23. New airport federal funding was announced on May 11 to assist with COVID-19 recovery.  (Northern View file photo)
New federal airport funding takes off

Flights on track to resume June 23 at Prince Rupert Regional Airport

Daily confirmed COVID-19 cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day rolling average in white, to May 12, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. preparing ‘Restart 2.0’ from COVID-19 as June approaches

Daily infections fall below 500 Friday, down to 387 in hospital

Bradley Priestap in an undated photo provided to the media some time in 2012 by the London Police Service.
Serial prowler acquitted of duct tape possession in B.C. provincial court

Ontario sex offender on long-term supervision order was found with one of many ‘rape kit’ items

Steven Shearer, <em>Untitled. </em>(Dennis Ha/Courtesy of Steven Shearer)
Vancouver photographer’s billboards taken down after complaints about being ‘disturbing’

‘Context is everything’ when it comes to understanding these images, says visual art professor Catherine Heard

Trina Hunt's remains were found in the Hope area on March 29. Her family is asking the public to think back to the weekend prior to when she went missing. (Photo courtesy of IHIT.)
Cousin of missing woman found in Hope says she won’t have closure until death is solved

Trina Hunt’s family urges Hope residents to check dashcam, photos to help find her killer

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam listens to a question during a news conference, in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Restrictions will lift once 75% of Canadians get 1 shot and 20% are fully immunized, feds say

Federal health officials are laying out their vision of what life could look like after most Canadians are vaccinated against COVID-19

Police are at Ecole Mount Prevost Elementary but the students have been evacuated. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Gardener finds buried explosives, sparking evacuation of Cowichan school

Students removed from school in an ‘abundance of caution’

A COVID-19 patient receives oxygen outside a hospital in Jammu, India, Wednesday, May 12, 2021. (AP/Channi Anand)
B.C. donates $500K to Red Cross COVID-19 relief efforts in India

The money will provide oxygen cylinders and ambulances for patients in communities grappling with the virus

Superintendent Aaron Paradis, community services officer with the Surrey RCMP, during a media availability about a recent drug bust in Port Coquitlam. (Photo: Lauren Collins)
Police seize 13 million ‘potentially fatal doses’ of pure fentanyl at B.C. drug lab

The evidence was seized at large, illicit drug manufacturing site in Port Coquitlam

B.C. Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth debates the province’s latest measure to control crime, March 10, 2021. The legislation allows police to impound vehicles used to transport weapons and further restricts sale of vehicle and body armour. (B.C. legislature video)
B.C. seeking ways to ‘name and shame’ gangsters, minister says

Mike Farnworth appeals to family members to talk to police

Most Read