The Hanjin Scarlet sits in Prince Rupert’s inner harbour with its container cargo untouched.

Update: A solution for the cargo on the South Korean container ship

The South Korean container ship anchored in the Prince Rupert harbour full of cargo will be unloaded this week.

The South Korean container ship that has been anchored in the Prince Rupert harbour full of cargo since last Tuesday is being unloaded at the Fairview Container Terminal this morning.

The Hanjin Scarlet declared receivership on Tuesday, Aug. 30 after it arrived in the harbour, after Hanjin Shipping was reported to have applied for court protection from its creditors.

On Aug. 2, the Port of Prince Rupert announced in a press release, that DP world, the operator of Fairview Container Terminal and CN have arranged to move the Hanjin containers through the port. DP World requires pre-payment for handling the containers and CN is offering to move the goods from the port to various destinations in Canada and the U.S at a relevant rail charge.

The container vessel sitting in the Prince Rupert inner harbour unhandled and still full of cargo as of Tuesday morning, is an odd sight for residents of the town used to seeing expedient port activities and empty vessels out at sea.

“Following the Hanjin Scarlet’s arrival Tuesday evening, the vessel proceeded directly to an assigned anchorage, where it remains Wednesday following news that the Hanjin Shipping Co. has filed for receivership (a type of corporate bankruptcy where a receiver is directed by bankruptcy courts or creditors to run the company),” a press release on Aug. 31 from the Port of Prince Rupert stated.

Fairview Container Terminal owner and operator DP World, CN Rail and the Port of Prince Rupert continued to engage in dialogue to find a solution

“CN has advised that all Hanjin containers currently in its system will be released for pickup from its origin terminals, with no storage charges for these boxes. CN will not accept additional Hanjin export loads – or bookings from other shipping lines destined for Hanjin vessels,” the release from Aug. 31 continued.

The Port of Prince Rupert is not alone in its limbo. All over the globe, reports circled last week that Hanjin vessels had been denied at ports and action had been taken to seize the vessels and the South Korean company’s assets until bills were paid.

With files from Kevin Campbell

For more background on the story see: SOUTH KOREAN CARGO SHIP SITS OFF PRINCE RUPERT AFTER COMPANY’S FINANCIAL WOES.

Just Posted

Back on track: Rampage cruise past Hazelton

Kory Movold hat trick, strong goaltending from Devon Gerrits aid Rampage in scrappy affair

Two streaks end at Prince Rupert Rampage first away game

The Kitimat Ice Demons won their first game after two year drought

PRMS Grade 8 girls welcome Coast Tsimshian Academy for first home volleyball game

Sportsmanship was on display in Prince Rupert over the weekend

Return of the Rampage, and more Prince Rupert weekend sports briefs

Snooker season has started at the Legion, with five matches already in the books

MVP of the Week: Hockey and McArthur are like a pair of old chums

Gary McArthur founded a league for those who aren’t quite ready to hang up their skates

Greta Thunberg meets with First Nations chief in Fort McMurray

Thunberg has turned her protest against climate change into a global movement

Canucks hang on for 3-2 win over Rangers in New York

Vancouver scores three times in first period

More beef products recalled due to possible E. coli contamination

The food safety watchdog has been investigating possible E. coli 0157:H7

B.C. VIEWS: How to get the best deal on your ICBC car insurance

ICBC slowly being dragged into the 21st century

Pot legalization has gone ‘well’, but ‘yellow flags’ on vaping: task force chair

Canada legalized cannabis for non-medical use on Oct. 17, 2018,

ELECTION 2019: Federal leaders hit final 24 hours of campaign

Many leaders remain in B.C. for the final hours of the campaign

Most Read