Graffiti on two sides of a boulder in Death Valley National Park is from 2019 and 2020, marked “Steve & Lacy”. The National Parks Service is seeking a man from Grand Forks, B.C., in connection with the graffiti. (US National Parks Service)

U.S. officials look for B.C. man suspected of vandalizing Death Valley National Park

Rangers believe the man travelled with a dog named Lacy on his way to an off-road race

On a trip through the hellishly harsh Death Valley National Park in early 2020, Steve and Lacy allegedly left an illegal stamp on the desert in California.

According to a press release from the United States’ National Parks Service (NPS), rangers suspect an individual from Grand Forks, B.C., was involved in vandalizing rock faces, buildings and other infrastructure with graffiti that reads in part “Steve & Lacy.” The messages left indicate that the individual visited the park during lunar eclipses in January 2019 and 2020.

Rangers believe the individual travelled with a dog named Lacy on his way to an event called King of the Hammers – an off-road race in Johnson Valley, Cali. Graffiti and other forms of damage to parks are illegal, and the “Steve & Lacy” tag was found on at least five different sites within the park.

“It is heartbreaking to see treasures like Death Valley National Park get damaged by intentional acts such as these,” said Supt. Mike Reynolds in a release. “We ask park visitors to help us find those who should be held responsible, and thank hard working park rangers for efforts to prevent further damage.”

The NPS says that the most recent tags in Death Valley are linked to graffiti incidents that occurred last year.

The park’s rangers are asking the public for help in their investigation. Tips can be submitted anonymously to the National Park Service Investigative Services Branch (ISB). Their tip line can be reached via call or text at: 888-653-0009; online at www.nps.gov/ISB and click “Submit a Tip,” or emailed to nps_isb@nps.gov.

National parks in the United States and Canada are closed right now due to COVID-19, but public areas are still being monitored.


@jensenedw
Jensen.edwards@grandforksgazette.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

parks

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Heart of Our City: Ron Nyce

Teaching, dancing and encouraging culture create the heartbeat of this drummer

Breast cancer screening available in Prince Rupert – ten days only

Mobile imaging suite will be in Prince Rupert from July 6 to 16

RCSCC 7 – Captain Cook is searching for new C.O.

Officer position will be vacant with CIC sailing away to different shores.

Police investigate July 2 homicide in Houston

Man succumbed to injuries at Pearson Road residence

Solidarity movement displayed in city

Prince Rupert locals demonstrated against

B.C. records 31 new cases, six deaths over three days due to COVID-19

There are 166 active cases in B.C., 16 people in hospital

B.C. homeowners plead for action on condo insurance crisis

Strata property fees growing bigger than mortgage payments

Indigenous man behind complaint of BC Transplant’s alcohol abstinence policy has died

David Dennis, who is Nuu-chah-nulth, argued that six-month sobriety policy is a ‘lethal form of racism’

ICBC to resume road tests in July with priority for rebookings, health-care workers

Tests have been on hold for four months due to COVID-19

Urge travellers to follow COVID-19 rules in a ‘gentle way’: B.C.’s top doctor

Cases surging in the U.S. have B.C. officials hoping the border stays shut all summer

96-year-old woman scales B.C. butte with help of family, friends

‘I did as I was told and I enjoyed every minute of it’

Parallel crises: How COVID-19 exacerbated B.C.’s drug overdose emergency

Part 1: Officials say isolation, toxic drug supply, CERB, contributing to crisis

Canadians with disabilities disproportionately hit by COVID-19 pandemic

More than four out of 10 British Columbians aged 70 and up have various disabilities

Most Read