Motorists at the pump did not change their spending habits in lieu of the flooding in the south of the province, Chris Wilson, Petro-Canada Manager, said. (Photo: Norman Galimski/The Northern View)

Motorists at the pump did not change their spending habits in lieu of the flooding in the south of the province, Chris Wilson, Petro-Canada Manager, said. (Photo: Norman Galimski/The Northern View)

Transportation disruptions from floods don’t affect gas supply to Prince Rupert

No need to panic buy for fuel — Wilson

Prince Rupert motorists have no reason to worry about empty gas tanks after the province declared a state of emergency, on Nov. 17, as fuel supplies to the northwest continue as normal, suppliers said.

Various parts of the province, most affected by flood damages, were issued emergency orders restricting the non-essential purchase of gasoline to a quantity 30 litres during the provincial emergency.

North Coast MLA, Jennifer Rice urged residents, on Nov. 19, not to panic-buy gasoline as the restrictions on fuel did not apply in Northern B.C., adding that supply routes remained unaffected by the floods.

There was no noticeable change in consumer habits at the pump in the city, Chris Wilson, manager at the industrial park Petro-Canada, told The Northern View on Nov. 22.

“We’ve noticed the volume from day-to-day remained the same or what it usually is,” Wilson said, adding a few individuals did fill up jerry cans as a precaution. Still, the behaviour was not a widespread action disturbing supplies in stock.

Regarding gasoline and diesel supply to Prince Rupert, the floods in the Lower Mainland do not affect the supply chain. Gas and diesel supply to Prince Rupert come from Alberta, Wilson said.

“It’s coming from east of us, not south of us. [The floods] wouldn’t be anything affecting us fuel-wise,” he said. “Diesel gets trained in from Alberta to Terrace. Gas gets trucked in from Alberta.”

“There’s no need to panic buy for fuel. Everything in that sense will be fine,” Wilson said.

At the downtown Chevron station, consumption remained the same, and their supply has been a non-issue, Udham Sandhu, locations manager, said.

At the pumps, motorist Craig Kelly said the situation down south did not bother him at all.

“Life goes on,” he said. “We could cry about it and jump up and down doing cartwheels talking about it.”

Neither he nor his friends or family expressed concerns about gas supply, and they saw no need to purchase extra fuel.

As long as fuel prices stayed below two dollars per litre, Wilson said he isn’t going to worry about the fuel situation.


 
Norman Galimski | Journalist 
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