Shannon Lough / The Northern View The only way the one funeral home in Prince Rupert will move a body is to and from the morgue, to Terrace to the crematorium, or to the cemetery, not from a home.

There is no service in Prince Rupert to transport the dead

BC Emergency Health Services will temporarily transfer bodies from the home to the hospital

There is one funeral home within 140 km of Prince Rupert, with one licensed funeral director in his 60s, who made the decision a year ago that he could no longer transport the deceased — there simply weren’t enough resources.

A year later, two families were shocked to find that even the BC Ambulance Service wouldn’t move their loved ones who had just died.

Sheril MacRae at Ferguson Funeral Home Ltd., the only funeral home in Prince Rupert, received a call one Sunday, at 5 a.m., from someone requesting their body removal services after paramedics said it wasn’t within their duties to take a deceased man to the hospital. She had to turn them down.

“We’re just a tiny, independent funeral home,” said MacRae, who is the only other full-time employee along with Jim Ferguson.

It takes the pair 80 hours to provide funeral services for one person. When Ferguson was providing body transportation services he was on call all hours of the day. After 40 years, he couldn’t do it anymore — MacRae notified the Prince Rupert Regional Hospital of their decision.

“A year ago, we called the people who we thought would get the message across, but somehow the message didn’t get down the pipe,” MacRae said. “It’s upsetting to us that this miscommunication is happening.”

This is the second incident since January.

Currently, in Prince Rupert, if someone dies of natural causes in thierhome, there is no service available that will take them to the morgue.

After the two most recent incidents in the city, BC Emergency Health Services has stepped in to fill the void, calling the situation “exceptional.”

“We are currently fulfilling that role in Prince Rupert on an interim basis, with the understanding that there are no readily available transport services for the deceased,” said Shannon Miller, communications officer with BC Emergency Health Services.

“This is a temporary measure until Northern Health is able to establish a permanent option with the Ministry of Health, BC Coroner and local funeral services.”

Typically, the only time a paramedic will move a body is when: a patient dies inside the ambulance on the way to the hospital; when they’re under the direction of a police officer and a coroner to remove a body from a public place; or when there is no other readily available removal service.

For the time being, paramedics will transport the deceased in the city, but Miller stresses that 911 medical emergency calls will take priority.

Be prepared

With expected, planned home deaths, Northern Health and Ferguson Funeral Home want residents to have a plan in place so they’re prepared for body removal so that it’s not a total shock when the moment comes.

Before the ambulance service stepped up there was no other way to move a body from a home to the hospital morgue unless an authorized next of kin did it themselves.

In 2006, the province issued a protocol for planned home deaths to make sure the procedures were laid out clearly. Police or ambulance services shouldn’t be contacted with anticipated deaths at home — the local funeral home should be aware and authorization should be in place before the person dies.

Legally, funeral homes need this authorization to remove the body. Families shouldn’t wait longer than four to six hours to transfer the body to the morgue. Ferguson Funeral Home uses the hospital’s morgue as they don’t have their own.

The legal authorization form includes a line that the funeral home will be used for transport — what isn’t clear is what happens when that service isn’t available.

Northern Health communications manager Eryn Collins said BC Emergency Health Services, funeral providers and the coroner are looking for solutions for transporting human remains following an expected death.

”EHS is going to fulfill this role as a temporary measure until a more clear permanent process can be worked out,” said Collins.

The nearest funeral home, MacKay’s Funeral Service Ltd. in Terrace, offers after-hours body removal services from the hospital and they have provided the service to Prince Rupert.

Unnatural deaths

Another body removal service recently posted a job in Prince Rupert.

Starting April 1, CAML-Dah Danesdih Transportation Services is looking for two employees to do scene body removal.

This is an on-call position for all hours of the day, with a starting salary of $20-25 an hour. The Smithers-based company is taking over a contract for the area from Prince Rupert and Terrace, Hazelton and Burns Lake, all the way to the Yukon.

“You will be required to attend scenes which may be graphic in nature, i.e. traffic accidents,” the post reads.

Training and equipment will be provided, and everything dealt with on the job must be kept confidential.

“We do work with body removal companies to remove [the deceased] in a respectful and dignified way,” confirmed Andy Watson, spokesperson for the BC Coroners Service.

When asked if this service could be extended to natural deaths, Watson said the coroner has no jurisdiction in circumstances in a home death when it’s expected and natural.

For natural deaths MacRae said it is very sad that this is happening now.

“Calm and peaceful — that’s the way it’s supposed to be.”

RELATED: B.C. paramedics to be trained in at-home care for seriously ill, end-of-life patients

To report a typo, email: editor@thenorthernview.com.


Shannon Lough | Editor
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