This young Albertan is the first of many kids and adults alike to experience the public breakwater's new binoculars and interpretive signage to get a closer experience of marine mammals.

STORY AND VIDEO: Whale Trail gives a closer look at marine life

The city became the latest stop on the network of shore-based marine mammal viewing sites along North America’s Pacific Coast




Prince Rupert’s public breakwater just got even better, with the installation of viewing binoculars and interpretive signage as part of the West Coast’s “Whale Trail”.

The city became the latest stop on the network of shore-based marine mammal viewing sites along North America’s Pacific Coast, from the Central California coast to northern B.C. The Whale Trail is a Seattle-based organization dedicated to identifying sites along the west coast where the public is most likely to view marine mammals from shore.

The binoculars and signage was funded through the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre, Prince Rupert LNG and the Port of Prince Rupert.

“Improving our understanding of the marine mammals that transit Canada’s west coast waters is an effort we’re proud to support,” said Jason Scherr, Sustainability Manager for the Port of Prince Rupert.

Caitlin Birdsall, coordinator of the North Coast Cetacean Research Initiative through Vancouver Aquarium, coordinated the addition of the breakwater as a “Whale Trail” stop with the City’s marina staff.

“Prince Rupert’s breakwater provides an ideal viewing site for The Whale Trail, and its accessibility will help us in our efforts to engage citizen scientists to learn about and collect data on cetaceans,” Birdsall said.

As well as information about local species, the new signage encourages people to report their marine mammal sightings for conservation-based research. From the public breakwater, there are more than six species of marine mammals that can potentially be spotted, including sea lions, harbour seals, humpback whales, killer whales, and both harbour and Dall’s porpoises. Descriptions of each species are listed on the sign, along with behavioural attributes and the likelihood of spotting them.

Also on the sign, the names of all the different species were translated into Sm’algyax, the language of the local Tsmsyen people.

For more information on The Whale Trail, visit thewhaletrail.org.

 

Just Posted

WATCH: Going once, going twice… Rotary Auction gone!

The Prince Rupert Rotary club received $85K in donations and made $60k back in revenues

Prince Rupert’s Salvation Army receives $550 on a 550th celebration

The Indo Canadian Sikh Association of Prince Rupert will be celebrating their first Sikh Guru

The Northern View presents Santa Shops Here in Prince Rupert

More reasons to spend your shopping dollars locally

New band mayor elected in Lax Kw’alaams

Garry Reece Sr. will be replacing John Helin as band mayor

STORY & VIDEO: Crafty combo means even more entertainment at this year’s Kaien Island Craft Fair

Live music and food were 2019’s new arrivals at the popular event

Your Prince Rupert 55th Rotary Auction guide

Online guide to all the items up for bid before Monday’s live auction

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

65-million-year-old triceratops makes its debut in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a 65-million-year-old dinosaur

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

Security guard at Kamloops music festival gets three years for sexually assaulting concertgoer

Shawn Christopher Gray walked the woman home after she became seperated from her friends, court heard

Most Read