This young Albertan is the first of many kids and adults alike to experience the public breakwater's new binoculars and interpretive signage to get a closer experience of marine mammals.

STORY AND VIDEO: Whale Trail gives a closer look at marine life

The city became the latest stop on the network of shore-based marine mammal viewing sites along North America’s Pacific Coast




Prince Rupert’s public breakwater just got even better, with the installation of viewing binoculars and interpretive signage as part of the West Coast’s “Whale Trail”.

The city became the latest stop on the network of shore-based marine mammal viewing sites along North America’s Pacific Coast, from the Central California coast to northern B.C. The Whale Trail is a Seattle-based organization dedicated to identifying sites along the west coast where the public is most likely to view marine mammals from shore.

The binoculars and signage was funded through the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre, Prince Rupert LNG and the Port of Prince Rupert.

“Improving our understanding of the marine mammals that transit Canada’s west coast waters is an effort we’re proud to support,” said Jason Scherr, Sustainability Manager for the Port of Prince Rupert.

Caitlin Birdsall, coordinator of the North Coast Cetacean Research Initiative through Vancouver Aquarium, coordinated the addition of the breakwater as a “Whale Trail” stop with the City’s marina staff.

“Prince Rupert’s breakwater provides an ideal viewing site for The Whale Trail, and its accessibility will help us in our efforts to engage citizen scientists to learn about and collect data on cetaceans,” Birdsall said.

As well as information about local species, the new signage encourages people to report their marine mammal sightings for conservation-based research. From the public breakwater, there are more than six species of marine mammals that can potentially be spotted, including sea lions, harbour seals, humpback whales, killer whales, and both harbour and Dall’s porpoises. Descriptions of each species are listed on the sign, along with behavioural attributes and the likelihood of spotting them.

Also on the sign, the names of all the different species were translated into Sm’algyax, the language of the local Tsmsyen people.

For more information on The Whale Trail, visit thewhaletrail.org.

 

Just Posted

Haida Gwaii storm causes B.C. ferry delay

Skidegate to Prince Rupert route affected

Prince Rupert Rampage 2019-20 season schedule released

Trio of games against Terrace River Kings plus showdowns against new teams highlight the season

Council briefs: Gurney marks one year as Lester Centre’s manager, marina revenues down

Council supports Métis Awareness week but has concern over raising Infinity Flag

In-brief: Electric charging station available in Prince Rupert, Metlakatla senior housing taking applications

Weather dampens paving plans on McBride, The Northern View Cannery Road Race is coming down the road

Prince Rupert shuttle service set to get underway

New shuttle bus between Prince Rupert and Terrace

Captain, all-star, MVP, and all about the team

Brittanne O’Connor’s drive to create Prince Rupert’s own women’s team has led to success and inspiration

The Northern View announces inaugural Tyee Fishing Derby in Prince Rupert

More than $7,000 up for grabs for biggest legal salmon and halibut

The Northern View 2019 Readers Choice

It’s that time of year again! Vote online or at the Prince Rupert office before noon on Aug. 30

Bodies of two missing Surrey men found near Ashcroft: RCMP

Ryan Provencher and Richard Scurr have been missing since July 17

B.C. manhunt suspects left cellphone video before they died: family

Family member says Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky recorded final wishes

VIDEO: RCMP unveil new, state-of-the-art forensics lab in Surrey

The laboratory is expected to handle thousands of forensic services from across Canada annually

Scheer promises EI tax credit for new parents if Conservatives form government

The government currently taxes employment insurance benefits for new parents

B.C. seizes 1.5M grams contraband tobacco, down from 5.75M grams the year prior

The 2019-2020 seizures were a sharp drop compared to the 2018-2019 year,

Most Read