Transition Prince Rupert president Ken Shaw and his team of stakeholders presented three unique concept designs for McKay Street Park on Sept. 14.

STORY AND VIDEO: Three designs presented in McKay Street Park’s future look

It’s a common refrain that people shape the town they live in, but last Wednesday, things took a literal turn in Prince Rupert.



It’s a common refrain that people shape the town they live in, but last Wednesday, things took a literal turn in Prince Rupert.

From 3 – 6 p.m., the public was invited out to the west side of town to McKay Street Park.

Currently a derelict and fenced up piece of two-acre property, Transition Prince Rupert led a design feedback session in front of the park that offered three different design graphics representing what the park could turn into.

The designs were created from workshops, stakeholder meetings and pure discussion with residents of the town since fall 2015.

Placemaking expert Mark Lakeman and his team from Seattle helped the McKay Street Park steering committee develop goals and a vision for a sustainable community park, one that is entirely inclusive for Prince Rupert residents. From the ideas of what to include to the design, to the construction of the project, the park is meant to be shaped by the community from the ground up.

“Each design has a lot of the same elements – a covered basketball area, a dog-walking area, a picnic site, skateboard park, community garden and you’ll see they’re organized with a different sort of central feature,” said Ken Shaw, president of leading organizer Transition Prince Rupert, and original proponent of the revitalization project since 2013 last Wednesday.

“What we’re seeing right now is placemaking. Usually what we do with these kinds of projects is just hire someone to design it and then go and build it. We’re getting input so people feel like their voice has been heard,” said Shaw.

“We want to do the construction in a way that people actually play a role in making the place. So whether it’s putting in some of the landscape, the bedding, or assisting some way in the construction, that’s a piece we still have to figure out. The most important part is being part of the idea and it’s creation, [the sense of] ‘This is my park. I did that’.”

Poster boards, questionnaires and stickers were part of Wednesday’s proceedings, as were active and playful kids, that didn’t need the design just yet to have fun in the open space that afternoon.

The three designs were named ‘Commons’, ‘Village’ and ‘Forest’, all with a unique design layout, but share most basic traits.

Design elements include basketball pavilions, dog walking areas, picnic shelters with outdoor kitchen, BMX track, totem carving shed, community centre, public square, swings, skate park, totem poles and a community garden.

“The ideas represented on these designs have been from extensive public engagement over the last year and now we want to continue public engagement – get people’s input on these three designs and then really lock it into one design. From there we’d go into another phase, which is raising a whole bunch of money in the community, doing this bottom-up and seeing if we can get something built in 2017-18,” added Prince Rupert Mayor Lee Brain.

“I like the basketball pavilion. It’s my favourite part with the big totems. I think that’s needed because this could be an All Native Basketball Tournament training ground all year long, with outdoor basketball you can play 24/7 … I think that’ll be a huge hit if we can get that built,” said the mayor, who was on the Transition Prince Rupert board in 2013.

North Coast MLA Jennifer Rice also applauded the design process.

“One of the things we hear a lot in Prince Rupert is there’s nothing for us to do and people complain about the amount of time kids longer around in the malls. We don’t have a lot of covered places, so I like the element of having covered spaces the whole family can go to, like the covered picnic area. Those are the types of features people can take pride in,” she said.

In addition to Transition Prince Rupert, the project so far has been funded by Redesign Rupert, the Port of Prince Rupert, the City of Prince Rupert and DP World, with City Repair, Communitecture, and Caitlin Pope Daum Landscape Architecture behind the designs.

For those who missed Wednesday’s session the poster board designs will be on display at Northern Savings Credit Union and visit the Facebook page Transition Prince Rupert for a link to an online questionnaire about the three designs.

Lakeman’s team at City Repair is expected to take the feedback and present a final design in November.

 

Just Posted

Thanksgiving Food Drive looking for donations from Rupert and Port Edward this weekend

With 30 families volunteering this year the food drive can cover both municipalities

STORY, PHOTOS, VIDEO: Terry Fox’s spirit alive and well in Prince Rupert

Town shows up again in numbers— physically and financially — to push for a cure

Holkestad’s hold off the competition at Seniors’ Open

Husband and wife duo remain top of the table at Prince Rupert Golf Course

City of Prince Rupert strengthen their commitment to Coast Tsimshian nations

Prince Rupert, Lax Kw’alaams and Metlakatla sign memorandum of understanding

Heart of Our City: Giving back to their street friends one meal at a time

Karlene Campbell and Marvin Spencer feed the homeless every Sunday

The Northern View Cannery Road Race: Photos and video

The Northern View’s 2019 Cannery Road Race draws hundreds of runners from Prince Rupert to Terrace

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Largest driving factor is the province’s complex stumpage system that results in high fees, expert says

20 day search for missing Labradoodle in Princeton, B.C. ends with tears of joy

The search brought out bloodhounds, and groups hoping to find Mordy

Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, US$17.6-million deal

Young sniper will be in Vancouver Tuesday

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

Most Read