PNW LNG's Derek Beker presented to three councils and districts last week.

Regional district awaits PNW’s TERMPOL results

NCRD waits for critical evaluation of emergency preparedness on the water related to PNW LNG

Derek Baker’s vocal chords tested their limits this past week when the Pacific NorthWest LNG community relations advisor gave three presentations to various councils and boards on the status of the company’s LNG export project.

First appearing before the North Coast Regional District (NCRD) on the evening of Oct. 21, Baker and Tessa Gill, head of external affairs at Pacific NorthWest LNG (PNW LNG) answered the board’s questions around the facility on Lelu Island, specifically around contingency efforts should there be a spill or similar issue transporting the product from the harbour to its customers. Baker and Gill later presented to the councils of the City of Prince Rupert and the District of Port Edward.

Gill explained that the company is always in ongoing discussion with various regulators and agencies regarding risk assessment, but that PNW LNG is also awaiting the results of its TERMPOL process (Technical Review Process of Marine Terminal Systems and Transshipment Sites), which will outline in detail things like vessel safety, loading and unloading and transporting the product.

“The first thing you want to do is prevent, mitigate and then look at your contingency planning, so I think one of the things that the proponent has to do with the regulators, because this is a discussion with Transport Canada, the regulators [and] Coast Guard – is [say] what is the emergency response contingency planning for the type of vessels that come into the area?” said Gill.

“We don’t see all the results of that yet, but that’s a discussion we know is ongoing … I’d encourage the board to reach out and say we’re interested in having that discussion on those TERMPOL results with this proponent.”

NCRD director Des Nobels also asked who monitors PNW LNG’s emission reports and the wetlands offsetting program.

Gill said that it’s the climate action secretariat in B.C. that oversees the plant’s emissions as a third-party and double checks PNW LNG’s gauges and systems.

In discussing wetlands compensation, Baker mentioned that the company has a responsibility to provide double the productive wetlands somewhere else for every amount of lost lands associated with the project.

“We have to do everything in our power to keep that wetlands productive … If it’s an unavoidable loss, we have a responsibility to ensure we have a 2:1 compensation for wetlands lost,” said Baker.

Gill added that the company has identified areas where wetlands can be provided for.

“The best benefits for offsetting, and the most effective, is actually in the region or as close to the area that you’re disturbing, so we would welcome some input and some feedback on some areas that need help [being rehabilitated],” Gill mentioned.

NCRD chair Barry Pages asked if the company has a timeline around a final investment decision and the representatives stated that one has not been provided by the shareholders at this time.

“Obviously the regulatory process has taken a long time, and if anybody says that this wasn’t a thorough and exhaustive regulatory process, then come and chat with us because it was quite thorough – it took three years, that’s how thorough it was. Because of that and while we were waiting for that process to be completed, the market has changed,” said Gill.

“From a shareholder perspective, they have a bit of time now that they can really evaluate this.”

The NCRD will now await the results of the TERMPOL assessment to identify potential gaps in transportation safety.

PNW LNG updates Port Edward council

There is an oversupply of LNG in the global market and Pacific NorthWest LNG won’t know if it’s moving forward with its project until its shareholders evaluate the market conditions and trends and make a decision.

Baker and Gill spoke to council on what they do know.

“We do expect LNG demand to continue to rise into the future,” Baker said. There is a prediction that there will be an undersupply by 2025 depending on how many projects go ahead.

In the previous council meeting, Coun. James Brown suggested Port Edward tries to join the independent environmental monitoring committee, one of the 190 conditions legally binding conditions laid out by the federal government in its approval of the project.

“We would recommend that if there’s interest from the district to contact CEAA (Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency) and let your interests be known,” Baker said, as this is out of the proponent’s control.

– With files from Shannon Lough

Just Posted

Prince Rupert lawyer awarded Queen’s counsel designation

Barry Zacharias is one of 28 lawyers to receive the award in B.C.

Prince Rupert draws its line for cannabis business

City council approved cannabis retail zone area on Dec. 10 after a public hearing

Rushbrook Trail partially closed after storm

Trees collapsed during a windstorm in Prince Rupert Monday night partially obstructing the trail

Charles Hays Rainmakers dry up in final game

The Charles Hays Rainmakers finished second at the No Regrets Tournament over the weekend

Students learn how to code a drone in SD52

Prince Rupert Middle School students tested their programming skills during the Hour of Code

Prince Rupert Rampage host Teddy Bear night

Prince Rupert Rampage teamed up with the Salvation Army to give back this weekend

Shop Prince Rupert is back

These businesses are all taking part in the Shop Prince Rupert event until December 21 at noon

Humboldt Broncos, cannabis, Fortnite: Here are Canadians’ top Google searches for 2018

When celebrities died or Canada Post went on strike, Canada turned to Google

B.C. billionaires worth 5,845 times average middle-income household

Economists argue for changes to Canadian tax system benefitting rich

Condominium market still ‘a lot better’ than normal in Vancouver suburbs

The Fraser Valley, east of Metro Vancouver, has long been considered a more affordable haven for first-time homebuyers.

Retired B.C. teacher a YouTube Sudoku sensation

A retired Kelowna teacher has amassed quite the following online by teaching the art of solving a Sudoku puzzle.

UN chief returns as climate talks teeter closer to collapse

Predictions from international climate expert, warn that global warming is set to do irreversible environmental damage.

Trump’s willingness to intervene in Meng detention roils Canada’s justification

The International Crisis Group said Tuesday, Dec. 11 it’s aware of reports that its North East Asia senior adviser Michael Kovrig has been detained.

Scientist awarded $100K for work on Arctic contaminants that led to ban

Derek Muir has received the $100,000 Weston Family Prize for his research that showed those carcinogens were able to move into the Arctic.

Most Read