Boil water notice will continue in Prince Rupert until further notice. Pixabay photo

Boil water notice will continue in Prince Rupert until further notice. Pixabay photo

Prince Rupert’s water still isn’t safe to drink

Multiple clear tests have to be received until Northern Health can remove the boil water notice

Two weeks after the first boil water notice was issued, the City of Prince Rupert has informed its residents that the water is still not safe to drink.

“Unfortunately, there are no treatment options available to the City to remove cryptosporidium at the source supply, and therefore there is currently no way to prevent or manage the issue other than to wait for the water to clear itself,” states the city’s press release on Dec. 28.

READ MORE: Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

The first notice went out on Dec. 14, when water testing results determined unacceptable levels of giardia and cryptosporidium. The city said this was caused by “a dry summer followed by recent storm surge events”.

Northern Health continues to monitor the water, and until further notice, residents must continue to boil water for at least one-minute before drinking, washing the dishes, brushing teeth, cooking, washing fruits and vegetables, and drinking water for pets.

In the press release, the city reiterated that it has applied for funding in August for its $30-million multi-phased water treatment facility. “Multiple treatment barriers will reduce the risk from cryptosporidium in the future, if we are successful in achieving the grant.”

The city will continue to work with Northern Health to monitor the water quality. The boil water notice will be in effect until there are multiple clear results.

“Ultimately, the goal is to be confident the levels are down to a point where the notice can be downgraded, that the water is safe to consume, and to know in advance if the risks are to increase again,” said Eryn Collins, communications manager for Northern Health.

The city, and Northern Health, doesn’t have a timeline for how long the notice may last.

READ MORE: Boil water notice in Prince Rupert expected to last another week



shannon.lough@thenorthernview.com

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