Grayson Witzke and Fisher Witzke in their garage shop where they sharpen ice skates for their Prince Rupert customers, on Feb. 2. (Photo: Norman Galimski/The Northern View)

Grayson Witzke and Fisher Witzke in their garage shop where they sharpen ice skates for their Prince Rupert customers, on Feb. 2. (Photo: Norman Galimski/The Northern View)

Prince Rupert brothers sharpen business basics

Young duo hones entrepreneurial skills

Prince Rupert has two new emerging entrepreneurs sharpening their skills in business to a savvy fine point.

The sibling duo of Grayson Witzke 13, and Fisher Witzke 11, are long-time hockey players who founded Prince Rupert Skate Sharpening.

The two bustling businessmen first thought of turning the family’s skate sharpening machine into a business, during the summer. Hailing from a hockey family, the boys had the right connections to jump-start their venture.

“We’ve been getting a lot of skates and a lot of phone calls by a lot of different people,” Grayson said.

Both boys are kept busy throughout the week sharpening skates with each responsible for fine-tuning up to six pairs a week.

On top of their business, the siblings still need to balance their other responsibilities such as studying and playing hockey.

Their mother couldn’t be happier with her sons’ initiative.

“I’m very proud of the boys for stepping up and showing up in the world this way. As small as it is, every little bit counts,” Chrissy Witzke said.

The young men have already learned some important business skills and lessons throughout their journey.

“It’s really easy to make money if you really think about something that you like doing,” Grayson said.

The brother’s favourite part about their business is the money they have been able to make for themselves, as well as making their customers happy with their like-new skates.

However, it’s not all fun and games. They don’t just get to pocket all of the money, their mother said.

“Every time they sharpen skates, they get paid. But they have to put money in a jar that goes toward paying off the machine. That’s part of running a business,” she said. “So, it takes some responsibility out of them to make sure that they get the skates done on time and that they satisfy their customers.”

So far, they have had excellent feedback from their patrons, the boys said.

“Sometimes they tip us,” Fisher said.

Looking to the future, the brothers are in business for the foreseeable future. However, Fisher is certain they won’t stay tied down to the skate sharpening business forever.

Only time will tell where these entrepreneurs will go — so keep a sharp eye out for them.

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Norman Galimski | Journalist
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