The Orient Peony is seen at the Westview Wood Pellet Terminal July 2 and has qualified under the Port of Prince Rupert’s Green Wave incentive program under RightShip for a tier one (10 per cent) discount on harbour dues.

Port launches Green Wave program

The Green Wave program gives shipping companies incentives to install emission-reduction technology on vessels

Being green is no Hulk joke to the Port of Prince Rupert.

The latest enhancement of their Green Wave program proves it, since sailors can now qualify for even more incentives, just for being green.

“It’s a good thing if sailors utilize cleaner technologies. It’s good for us because it reduces the total environmental footprint of the port’s operations and it’s good for the marine carriers because it means they pay less when calling on the Port of Prince Rupert,” Kris Schumacher said, communications Port of Prince Rupert (PPR).

The Green Wave program, launched in 2013, gives shipping companies incentives to install emission-reduction technology or other sustainable systems on vessels. By doing so, seafarers can apply through a number of environmental programs such as RightShip, Green Marine and the Environmental Ship Index to name a few, and qualify for one, two or three-tier discounts on harbour dues.

This year 59 unique vessels have already qualified for the Green Wave program and as of May 31 the Port of Prince Rupert has awarded a total of $51,354 in discounted harbour dues.

“Those 59 vessels represent 86 independent vessel calls which is 53 per cent of the total vessel calls the port has experienced this year. That means more than half the vessel calls this year have qualified,” Schumacher said.

The RightShip program launched their greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) rating in 2011 based on CO2 output which covers all in-service ocean vessels including cargo, ferries and others. They also provide an environmental risk rating and compare the ship’s relative efficiencies. Ships are categorize with similar sized ships and then we rate them against each other, Kris Fumberger, project lead said.

“So if you want to get your cargo from A to B you can compare the vessels and select the vessel you want to use for your particular shipment,” he said, adding even bulk carriers are compared to each other so people can find the cheapest and/or more environmentally friendly vessel.

RightShip’s risk rating is subscriber-based but the companies environmental rating is free of charge.

“It provides people with a simple tool to look at their efficiency and that’s what Prince Rupert uses as part of their port program,” Helen Gibney said, RightShip communications.

In 2014, 45 per cent (197) of vessels that called to Prince Rupert qualified for discounted harbour dues under the Green Wave incentive program. Of those 197, 84 per cent qualified through RightShips GHG rating.

“In recognition of that, any vessel now that has a right ship ‘A’ rating… will automatically qualify for the highest discount which is nearly 50 per cent off harbour dues,” Gibney said.

COSCO shipping line, one of the biggest container shippers in the world, has a number of vessels taking advantage of the port’s Green Wave incentives.

“Certainly we are very much in favour of participating in these type of programs. Not only are they good for local environment, ports and community, it’s good for ocean carriers in terms of the incentive attached,” Dave Bedwell said, executive vice-president COSCO.

Prince Rupert is one of the first in the world to start this type of program but Bedwell says other ports around the globe have also started to adopt similar initiatives.

“Port Metro Vancouver has a similar program and the USA’s east and west coast are also coming up with these types of incentives. Wherever our ships are calling and as long as they are new enough to be able to participate and qualify we certainly make sure they do participate. You’ll start to see more of these programs popping up more and more around the world,” Bedwell said.

 

Just Posted

Shutter Shack being held hostage by landlords, protesters say

Victoria-based landlords to supervise removal of equipment from their Prince Rupert commercial unit

B.C. chiefs show solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

Chiefs from around B.C. outside the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in Smithers show support.

Harbour debris burned in Tuck Inlet

400 cubic meters of material being burned by the Harbour Debris Society until January 17

Is Terrace prepared for a rail disaster?

Council asked to review surge in dangerous goods movement: “I live in the blast zone,” says resident

Rainmakers dominant over the weekend

Junior and Senior boys basketball teams score victories over Prince George

B.C. chiefs show solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

Chiefs from around B.C. outside the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in Smithers show support.

Chiasson nets shootout winner as Oilers edge Canucks 3-2

Edmonton moves one point ahead of Vancouver

B.C. chief says they didn’t give up rights for gas pipeline to be built

Hereditary chief: no elected band council or Crown authority has jurisdiction over Wet’suwet’en land

Condo rental bans may be on way out with B.C. empty home tax

Many exemptions to tax, but annual declarations required

UPDATE: B.C. boy, aunt missing for three days

The pair are missing from Kamloops

Daredevil changes game plan to jump broken White Rock pier

Brooke Colby tells council daredevil event would help boost waterfront business

Liberal bows out of byelection after singling out Jagmeet Singh’s race

Karen Wang says she made comments online that referenced Singh’s cultural background

Truck hauling compressed gas for ‘virtual pipeline’ crashes on B.C. highway

Driver charged and highway closed for nine hours - containers did not rupture

Most Read