An RCMP officer talks with a local resident before escorting them home at a roadblock in Portapique, N.S. on Wednesday, April 22, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Nova Scotia mass killer’s semi-automatic guns believed to have come from U.S.

The Mounties are still declining to reveal the brand or the calibre of the weapons

The RCMP says three of the four semi-automatic weapons used by a gunman during last month’s mass shooting in Nova Scotia are believed to have come from the United States.

The federal force says in a news release today that only one of the guns could be traced back to a source in Canada.

The Mounties are still declining to reveal the brand or the calibre of the weapons — two handguns and two rifles — used during the April 18-19 rampage that killed 22 people in five communities around the province.

Gabriel Wortman, who police have said didn’t have a licence for the weapons, was shot and killed by RCMP officers April 19 outside a gas station in Enfield, N.S.

Investigators also say they have identified the supplier of materials used to create the RCMP decals that were on the gunman’s replica patrol car, and they say the decals were created without the permission of the business owner.

In addition, the RCMP says it has specialists conducting a psychological autopsy of the gunman, with the goal of gaining insight into why he committed the murders.

Regarding a series of fires set by the gunman, investigators say they believe he used an accelerant, noting he had a significant supply of gasoline at his home in Portapique.

READ MORE: RCMP to draft national policy for emergency alerts after Nova Scotia shootings

READ MORE: Calls for crackdown on public trade in police gear after Nova Scotia shootings

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

gunsMass shootingsNova Scotia

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Search continues for wolf, senior citizen being transferred to Vancouver

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Sunken Gardens bloom from deeply seeded efforts

Garden club members are rooted in dedication

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

‘We’re sick of it’: Anger over police killings shatters U.S.

Tens of thousands marched to protest the death of George Floyd

Surrey mayor’s party under fire for ‘sickening’ tweet accusing northern B.C. RCMP of murder

Mayor Doug McCallum says tweet, Facebook post ‘sent out by unauthorized person’

Most Read