Technical problems had some Prince Rupert residents unaware of issues being discussed and decided at the City Council meeting on Dec. 7. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Nothern View)
No public feedback and comment on the 2022 budget was received at an April 11 Council of the Whole meeting (Photo: K-J Millar/The Nothern View)

Technical problems had some Prince Rupert residents unaware of issues being discussed and decided at the City Council meeting on Dec. 7. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Nothern View) No public feedback and comment on the 2022 budget was received at an April 11 Council of the Whole meeting (Photo: K-J Millar/The Nothern View)

No public feedback on proposed 2022 municipal budget

City project updates - new public washrooms are flushing out problems

There was no feedback or commenting offered about the proposed 2022 municipal budget during the second public opportunity at the Prince Rupert City Council meeting of the whole on April 11.

Corinne Bomben, chief financial officer, presented to the council a recap of issues addressed at the March 28 city council meeting about necessary cost increases and adjustments required to existing services in the proposed budget. The additional costs resulted in a proposed mill rate increase of 3.63 per cent or $67 for the average homeowner.

“Property owners are encouraged to calculate their expected taxes in order to be prepared for the payment due date of July 4 at midnight. On the city’s web page under Quick Links, property owners can view our 2022 budget informational documents, including our proposed five-year financial plan and our 2022 budget presentation from March 14,” Bomben said.

A monthly update report about ongoing city projects was presented at the regular city council meeting by Richard Pucci, director of operations and intergovernmental relations.

Pucci said there were several active major projects underway in various states of completion with the 3rd Ave. extension project 15 per cent complete after geotechnical investigations and reviews by city staff.

The new Eat Street location project is 100 percent complete with three food trucks on-site and new 24 hours washrooms.

“However, I have to report the washrooms are seeing significant abuse and sleeping inside. So we are working with the RCMP on that,” Pucci said.

The landfill cell and city recycling program are now 100 per cent complete, Woodworth Dam is 95 per cent finished with estimated final completion for the end of May, Pucci said.

Other projects less than 20 per cent complete include the water treatment at 10 per cent, with staff working on the requests for proposal (RFP) being issued in the next couple of weeks, as well as the sub-marine line RFP going out in the same time frame. The operations manager said the sewer treatment project has city staff making applications for additional grant funding to lessen the community burden.

Site preparations for the new RCMP detachment are set to break ground this summer with the project currently being 15 per cent complete.

City staff have completed “several milestones” necessary for the continuation of the Waterfront project, Pucci told the council. Several meetings have been held to push the development forward. It is anticipated progress will pick up in the next couple of months, he said.

At the meeting, City Council passed a resolution for project transition of the CN station and RCMP detachment projects to CT Northern Contractors Alliance Limited under a new Master Service Agreement (MSA). This will allow continued surety on rates and contractor availability, Pucci said.

Since March 2022, in terms of development permits, including minor works and sign permits, four were approved, one is in progress and one is on hold. Development variance permits saw six being approved, one denied, and one is on hold. Regarding the Official Community Plan and zoning bylaw amendments, two are in progress and four are on hold.


 
K-J Millar | Editor and Multi-Media Journalist 
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