A worker takes chains off a load of lumber at the new lumber transload facility on Ridley Island.

New lumber transload facility opens on Ridley Island

The Port of Prince Rupert has made it more attractive for clients farther away to ship lumber through Prince Rupert versus Vancouver.

The Port of Prince Rupert has made it more attractive for clients farther away to ship lumber through Prince Rupert versus Vancouver.

A brand new lumber transload facility, CT Terminals, is up and running on Ridley Island, brought to the area by a limited partnership consisting of Tidal Coast Terminals and Coast Tsimshian Enterprises.

The investment complements Tidal Coast Terminals’ main operational site at Prince Rupert’s Industrial Park at Butze Bay (a former saw mill location) which sorts logs, handles containers, reloads forest products and bagged cargo, and barges breakbulk cargo to vessels.

The lumber transload facility is a key utilization of the Port of Prince Rupert’s Road, Rail and Utility Corridor said Michael Gurney, manager of corporate communications at the Port of Prince Rupert last week, and communications coordinator Kris Schumacher explained the impact that the transload facility is already having.

“Prior to this lumber transfer facility on Ridley Island, all lumber exports through the Port of Prince Rupert came in two ways: in containers that were stuffed at CN’s intermodal facility in Prince George [and secondly,] trucked from mills in places like Burns Lake, Houston and Smithers,” Schumacher explained last week.

At the Prince George facility, logs are trucked in from nearby areas such as Quesnel, stuffed into containers and placed on trains bound for Prince Rupert all ready to be exported. As well lumber used to be trucked into a Quickload facility from nearby northwestern locations like Burns Lake, Houston and Smithers. Then it was unloaded, placed in containers and trucked to Fairview Container Terminal, said Schumacher.

“This new facility allows lumber exporters to access the Port of Prince Rupert by rail, without necessitating that the lumber be stuffed into a container prior to arriving. This expands our reach to industry further inland and will hopefully contribute to increasing exports through the Fairview Container Terminal going forward,” he said.

The lumber is brought into the facility by rail, and is mainly exported out to countries across the Pacific, but may stay in Prince Rupert for projects here. Right now, only lumber is handled at CT Terminals, but it has the capacity to handle all sorts of cargo, railed in from inward train cars. The terminal can also load cargo on outbound trains.

The terminal has an elevated loading ramp to meet the rail grade in offloading the lumber and multiple stations for it to be placed in containers on-site. The trucks then leave the area through an exit further ahead of the entrance to maintain a healthy flow of traffic.

CN Rail was abuzz on social media about the new facility, raving about its “high capacity, low dwell” capabilities on Twitter and Tidal Coast Terminals itself uploaded a brief video to YouTube showcasing the Ridley corridor facility from an up-close and aerial view. Look for that video online titled “CT Terminals” by YouTube user Tidal Transport.

 

Just Posted

BC Bus North service extended to September

Transportation ministers have extended the service, which was set to expire at the end of May

Nisga’a leader named UNBC chancellor

Dr. Joseph Arthur Gosnell is the first Indigenous leader to assume the role

Northwest local governments team up to fill in future employment gaps

Around 17,000 jobs will need to be filled in the region over the next eight years

Poetry month sees launch of “Oona River Poems” at Rupert library

Peter Christensen consciously and lovingly documents our physical and psychological landscapes

Lily Swanson celebrates her 90th birthday in Prince Rupert

The Acropolis Manor resident has 22 grandchildren and is a great grandmother to 25 children

Prince Rupert students share portraits of kindness with children in Peru

The Memory Project gives teens a chance to sharpen their art skills and global awareness

‘B.C. cannot wait for action’: Top doctor urges province to decriminalize illicit drugs

Dr. Bonnie Henry says current approach in ‘war on drugs’ has criminalized and stigmatized drug users

Canfor curtailing operations across B.C.

Low lumber prices and the high cost of fibre are the cause of curtailment

B.C. woman, 76, challenges alcohol-screening laws after failing to give breath sample

Norma McLeod was unable to provide a sample because of her medical conditions

New report on 2017 wildfires calls for better coordination with B.C. First Nations

Tsilhqot’in National Government documents 2017 disaster and lists 33 calls to action

B.C. youth coach banned amid sexual harassment, bullying scandal: Water Polo Canada

Justin Mitchell can’t take part in Water Polo Canada events or clubs

Wilson-Raybould: Feds want to just ‘manage the problem’ of Indigenous Peoples

Former federal justice minister speaks at First Nations Justice Council meeting in B.C.

Haida youth travels to New York for UN forum on Indigenous issues

Haana Edensaw presented her speech in Xaad Kil, Masset dialect of the Haida language

Female real estate agents warned of suspicious man in Metro Vancouver

The man requests to see homes alone with the female agent, police say

Most Read