Nathan Cullen

NDP’s Cullen seeks fifth term

Nathan Cullen enters the 2015 federal election as one of the more experienced veterans of his party’s candidates.

First elected in 2004 as the New Democratic Party Member of Parliament for Skeena-Bulkley Valley and returned with increasing margins of victory in 2006, 2008 and 2011, Nathan Cullen enters the 2015 federal election as one of the more experienced veterans of his party’s candidates.

And just 43, Cullen’s national status has risen thanks to his third-place finishing in the party’s 2012 leadership race, won by current NDP leader Tom Mulcair, to replace the late Jack Layton.

Cullen doesn’t hesitate when asked if he considers himself a professional politician.

“Oh, no. Not at all,” says Cullen, adding he was first thinking of running for a Smithers municipal council seat in 2003 before someone told him to set his sights higher.

“I was told it was a good idea and that I would win and that’s why I should go federal. I thought that was pretty audacious.”

Born in Toronto, the oldest of two sons to immigrants from Ireland, Cullen was educated at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario and at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario.

He then worked in Africa and South America for non-profit groups who had the goal of creating value-added industries instead of relying on the export of raw resources.

In many ways, Cullen says what he did on those two continents mirrors what’s happening in the Northwest, something that became apparent when he moved to Smithers in the late 1990s to first run the volunteer Katimavik program.

“If you only export raw resources, you’re always beholden to whatever the market calls,” he said.

It’s a theme people of all political persuasions will bring up in conversation, Cullen continues.

“They want to know why we’re sending out everything raw now,” he said.

It’s a message Cullen has also used in becoming one of the key figures opposing Enbridge’s plan to build the Northern Gateway pipeline, While Cullen has concentrated on the potential for environmental damage from a leak or break in the planned $6.5 billion pipeline which would run 1,177 kilometres across Alberta and B.C. and of the potential for ocean-going crude-carrying tankers spilling their loads, he’s also spoken about refining crude in Canada.

Building a facility would add value to a raw resource and provide jobs, he says. But if pressed, Cullen’s less comfortable about speaking where he thinks any kind of crude oil refining facility should be placed.

He’s more at home concerning the prospects  for liquefied natural gas (LNG), a value-added industry widely perceived as being less of an environmental threat than a crude-oil-carrying pipeline and crude-carrying tankers.

And, crucially for any industry to gain a foothold in B.C., there’s been more approval within First Nations to the point where a growing numbers of the latter are signing direct economic benefits deals with pipeline companies and LNG plant proponents.

“The devil is in the details,” said Cullen of the billions involved in building pipelines that would feed the super-cooling plants.

“It’s how you do it.”

And when there is opposition to any kind of pipeline construction, Cullen advocates a long- term approach.

The challenge, he says, is to have First Nations reach the stage where aboriginal people can make a decision and for aboriginal people to accept that decision even if they don’t agree with it.

“We may trust the process but First Nations may not have a process or they don’t respect the process or the governing structure,” said Cullen.

“What’s needed is a coherent political process with legal, scientific and all the components you want to have. They’re still building capacity,” he said of First Nations decision-making.

Cullen said he understands the positions taken by companies who ask who they need a ‘yes’ from in order to undertake a project.

“What this leads to is a greater urgency to making treaties,” he said.

 

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