Metlakatla ferry breaks free from dock

The Metlakatla ferry broke free from the Metlakatla Ferries dock near the Cruise Ship Terminal during Monday's windstorm.

  • Nov. 17, 2015 1:00 p.m.

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The Tsimshian storm plus 2 others of our ferries busted off our dock.. 😮 Worst storm we’ve seen here so far.. 😮

Posted by Whit Ryann on Monday, November 16, 2015



A Metlakatla ferry broke free from the Metlakatla ferry dock near the Cruise Ship Terminal during Monday’s windstorm in Prince Rupert.

The dock, owned by the Metlakatla First Nation experienced heavy wave conditions and the boat broke free from its moorings after the wind and waves usher it out towards the ocean.

“Strong winds on the afternoon of Nov. 16 resulted in boats at the Metlakatla ferry dock breaking free of their moorage after the rails were broken off of the dock itself. Fortunately the quick actions of Metlakatla Ferry Service personnel were able to prevent further damage to the vessels, the dock or nearby structures,” said Metlakatla communications coordinator Shaun Thomas on Tuesday.

“This is the first time in more than two decades such an incident has happened. While repairs to the dock will be underway soon, the Metlakatla Ferry Service will examine options to prevent a similar situation from happening again.”

Michael Gurney, manager of corporate communications with the Prince Rupert Port Authority, said that some damage to Prince Rupert’s port in general was sustained due to the windstorm.

“What we saw yesterday were heavy winds combined with a high tide. That meant for a little under an hour, there were extremely choppy seas in the inner harbour. Some damage to the Port Authority’s Lightering Dock was sustained; the dock’s gangway was actually thrown up on to the shoreline a short distance,” Gurney explained Tuesday.

“The M.V. Charles Hays, the Port Authority’s patrol vessel, was requested by Coast Guard to assist with an incident further up the harbour, after which it worked to remove some harbour debris that endangered vessels manoeuvring in the heavy waves. There was also some damage to the Charles Hays’ berth, but of course it was not moored there at the time, being hard at work.”

Video credit: Whit Ryann Facebook