Langford’s Kimberly Proctor was the victim of a brutal assault and murder in 2010. (Facebook/Kimberly’s Law)

Man who tortured and killed Vancouver Island teen in 2010 denied full parole

Kruse Wellwood was also denied temporary escorted absences

*Warning: This story contains graphic details about a murder.

One of the two men responsible for the brutal sexual assault, torture and murder of Langford teen Kimberly Proctor has been denied parole, less than one year after being denied day parole.

On Friday, May 15, Kruse Wellwood faced a parole hearing where he also requested escorted temporary absences but both were denied according to Proctor’s aunt, Jo-Anne Landolt.

According to Landolt, Wellwood asked for escorted absences to attend church on Sundays and be part of the faith community.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Proctor’s family members tuned in to the hearing by phone. It took place at Mission Institution, a medium-security prison where Wellwood is an inmate. Landolt said the family read victim impact statements or submitted them by video. She said the Parole Board of Canada deliberated for about 10 minutes before making the decision to deny his full parole.

“He’s still high risk for many things,” Landolt said. “They said he’s still showing signs of aggression and he was punching walls and himself.”

READ ALSO: Man who killed Langford teen attended her memorial service, demonstrates little remorse

In August, the board denied Wellwood’s request for day parole saying they still had concerns. A document regarding the past decision said he did not show any true sense of remorse or accountability, something Landolt said she feels hasn’t changed.

“He’s the same person he was 10 years ago, he’s just locked up,” Landolt said.

In March 2010, then 16-year-old Wellwood and 17-year-old Cameron Moffat bound, sexually assaulted, choked, gagged and placed Proctor in a freezer. The next day, they put her body in a duffel bag and took it to an area near the Galloping Goose to burn it. They were handed adult sentences of life in prison with no chance of parole for 10 years for the premeditated rape and murder of 18-year-old Proctor.

Moffat waived his day parole hearing last year and waived his full parole hearing as well, according to Landolt.

In 2011, a psychologist said Wellwood met the criteria for clinical psychopathy and sexual sadism and would require close supervision over the next 30 years or more. In July, a psychologist reiterated the previous assessment and did not support releasing Wellwood.

READ ALSO: Proctor’s killers troubled, angry from the start

The family and media were unable to attend the parole hearing due to COVID-19 restrictions and media were not given an option to call in. Landolt said the family expressed discontent with that decision, as now they have the added burden to reaching out to media to let the public know what the outcome was.

Landolt said Wellwood can apply for temporary absences again and will be able to apply for day parole in August. The next full parole hearing is still a few years away, but Landolt said she doesn’t think anything will change.

“Even if he said he had remorse it would be a lie,” Landolt said. “It’s stupid to even have these hearings because I don’t think there will ever be a point that he could be released.”

shalu.mehta@blackpress.ca


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