Amy Wong shows off her “wears” as a vendor at the first Kaien Island Seaside Pop-up Market held on Aug. 27. Wong knits mittens, gloves, scarves and hats with detachable bobbles for easy care and washing. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)

Amy Wong shows off her “wears” as a vendor at the first Kaien Island Seaside Pop-up Market held on Aug. 27. Wong knits mittens, gloves, scarves and hats with detachable bobbles for easy care and washing. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)

Kaien Island Pop-up Market a sell-out success in Prince Rupert

Ecotrust Canada is applying to NDIT for funds to continue the seaside market events

The first Kaien Island Seaside Pop-up Market was a sell-out success on Aug. 27, when some of the more than 27 vendors sold out of produce in under an hour.

“When I spoke with some of the vendors as the market came to a close, they were all smiles, and many said sales had been great. Many residents who braved the rain asked if this could be a more regular market,” said Shannon Lough communications manager for Ecotrust Canada, one of the lead partners.

Twenty-eight vendors selling fresh local produce, baked goods, prepared foods, crafts, soaps, and jewelry set up tents to cover themselves from the rain while market-goers perused and purchased goods from stalls.

“It was clear to the organizers that there’s an interest in having a consistent market here in Prince Rupert on Coast Ts’msyen Territory,” she said.

Ecotrust Canada wants to continue the pop-up events and is planning another for later in the year with the date yet to be determined.

The organization requested a letter from Prince Rupert City Council on Aug. 22 to support their application to Northern Development Initiative Trust for $30,000 for two community markets. The request states they are building toward a more permanent market for the spring of 2023.

“Prince Rupert has a lot to offer. These pop-up pilot events are proving how much of a need and want our community has for a permanent space to bring our artisans and the community together. I’m very excited for the future,” said Alicia Garcia, program coordinator at Hecate Strait Employment Development Society (HSEDS) another of the principal organizing partners.

“[Our city] has so many locals who are unique and creative just needing a little support and space to reach the community with local products,” Garcia said.

Lough said highlights of the afternoon, held on the premises of HSEDS, included how fast the Messy Bun and Sourdough YPR sold out in a very short time.

“Over 92.5 kilograms of local produce was sold from Farmer Cam’s Foods, the Charles Hays Secondary School greenhouse, and the Sndoyntga Lax Kx’een ada Maxłaxaała urban farm, based in downtown Prince Rupert. They sold cucumbers, zucchini, peas and beans, and tomatoes,” Lough said.

Also, a special draw to the event was a beer garden held at Wheelhouse Brewing Co. where there were servings and sales of Gose seaweed beer as a fundraiser. Fundraising proceeds went to Oots’n Reconnection Services which is dedicated to providing land and ocean-based experiential learning opportunities for youths on Coast Ts’msyen Territory in the North Coast.

READ MORE: Bushels of bounty – Pop-up market in Prince Rupert


K-J Millar | Editor and Multimedia Journalist
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