More resources for the Canadian Coast Guard and oil spill response teams is one of the recommendations outlined in the report of a government-appointed panel.

Federal government not planning to immediately implement oil tanker recommendations

If any companies want to run oil tankers along the west coast, they better be prepared to pay the price should something happen.

If any companies want to run oil tankers along the west coast, they better be prepared to pay the price should something happen.

That was one of the recommendations provided to the federal government by a panel of experts appointed to report on oil tanker safety and provide recommendations on what action should be taken. In the Dec. 3 report, A Review of Canada’s Ship-Source Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime—Setting the Course for the Future, the panel makes a total of 45 recommendations to create a world-class safety system for moving oil via tanker which range from removing the $166 million per-spill liability limit to conducting spill exercises every year to providing additional resources to the Canadian Coast Guard and Transport Canada to improve the spill response system.

While the report notes the Enbridge Northern Gateway and Kinder Morgam pipeline expansion could bring an additional 600 tankers to waters around the province, federal Minister of Transport Lisa Raitt said the government will not immediately be implementing the recommendations.

“The expert panel had its independence and traveled across the country … Transport Canada officials have the information now, they have to digest it,” she said,

“Tanker safety really is about common sense at the end of the day. We have to protect ourselves and we have to protect our communities.”

Rait said Transport Canada officials will likely be visiting impacted communities to gather feedback, and encouraged anyone with an interest in the subject to view the report and reach their own conclusions.

“It’s a public report, I think the public should go onto the website, read the report and provide feedback.

However, feedback from environmental groups to the report and the recommendations was swift.

“The government cannot legislate safety at the stroke of a pen. The hard work—identifying sensitive resources that need protecting, finding safe places for ships to weather a storm, installing and testing a whole new system of navigation—has simply not been done. To suggest that we can move ahead with massive increases in tanker traffic without these precautions is foolhardy,” said Living Oceans Society executive director Karen Wristen.

“The report highlights many areas where we need additional regulation, infrastructure, training and human resources. However, it ignores the essential fact that it will take many years and hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars to put those essential pieces in place. Meanwhile, regulatory processes are steaming ahead with proposals that could see up to 700 laden supertankers plying B.C. waters each year.”

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