Full-size geoduck clams are kept fresh in seawater before being transported. International markets for specialty products such as this have collapsed during the COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)

Full-size geoduck clams are kept fresh in seawater before being transported. International markets for specialty products such as this have collapsed during the COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)

Federal fund offers relief to B.C. seafood processors

Industry alliance grateful, but says B.C. deserves more

B.C.’s seafood processors will soon have access to $9 million in federal funds to help them adapt to market instabilities and new safety guidelines brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The money is western Canada’s share of the $62.5 million Canadian Seafood Stabilization Fund (CSSF) that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced April 25. On Wednesday, June 17, government ministers provided specifics on the aid package’s distribution.

“COVID-19 has created real challenges for our fish and seafood processing sector, and they have continued to respond with tenacity and innovation,” Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans, and the Canadian Coast Guard stated in a joint press release. “The Canadian Seafood Stabilization Fund will provide the sector with the support they need to increase their capacity and adapt their strategies to meet the changing demands of the consumer. And we know that by bolstering our processors, we are ensuring consistent buyers for our harvesters and a strong food supply chain, one that includes a consistent stream of Canada’s world class fish and seafood.”

In addition to the $9 million earmarked for B.C. and the prairie provinces, Atlantic Canada will share $38.14 million, while Quebec alone will receive $9.2 million. DFO has reserved $6.2 million to address emerging industry needs. The government calculated its funding allotment for each region based on the size of their processing industry.

READ MORE: Government pledges $3M to improve salmon stocks, restoration in B.C.

Christina Burridge, executive director of the B.C. Seafood Alliance, said the funding is very welcome to processors but B.C. deserves more than a 14 per cent share among four other provinces.

“The Seafood Stabilization Fund is unfair to British Columbia. Our share of the funding should have been higher … Quebec has an industry that’s worth around $450 million per year, ours is worth $1.8 billion per year. Yet, they get more than we do.”

She blamed the imbalance on an “genuine anomaly” in how Statistics Canada calculates its salmon aquaculture data, which she said is a complex problem that requires attention once the pandemic eases.

In the meantime she said the sector’s quick response to the pandemic with precautionary measures and layoffs to allow for physical distancing in the plants allowed processors to fare better than some other sectors, but alliance members are still facing mounting costs amid gutted sales. For personal protection equipment alone, she said a mid-sized processing facility in B.C. will have spent about $50,000 to get their employees through to September.

B.C.’s seafood industry is primarily driven by international exports worth $1.39 billion, as of 2018, but the pandemic has halted prime markets for high-end products. Burridge said its highly unlikely that gap can be filled domestically.

“Roughly half our wholesale value comes from live and specialty products like geoduck, sea urchins, sea cucumbers and herring roe. They will never have a domestic market of any substance, so we really have to be focused on regaining those export markets.”

B.C.’s $739-million salmon export sector also faced new challenges this week when state-run-newspapers in China reported a fresh COVID-19 outbreak in Beijing could be traced to a cutting board used for imported European salmon. China’s Centre for Disease Control and Prevention disproved the hypothesis, but B.C. exporters fear it will have lasting effects on China’s consumer confidence.

READ MORE: B.C.’s wild seafood exports snagged in Beijing’s recent COVID-19 panic

The CSSF is intended to help processors increase storage capacity to better deal with raw materials and manage inventory, adopt new equipment to keep workers safe, improve product quality and packaging, increase productivity and respond to new market demands like transportation solutions.

The fund is open to fish, seafood, and aquaculture processing businesses, as well as not-for-profit organizations that support the sector.

Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) will manage the fund in Western Canada. In B.C. applications can be filed beginning June 22 through the Investment Agriculture Foundation of BC.

On June 16, the federal government also announced the re-opening of its $42-million Canadian Fish and Seafood Opportunities Fund in response to COVID-19 pressures. The fund was first launched in 2018 to help the industry access new markets. The program is cost-shared with provinces who cover 30 per cent.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Glenn Hall, resident at Yellowhead Pioneer Residence Assisted Living in Barrierem B.C. received their first COVID-19 vaccinations on Jan. 19. (Pam Simpson photo)
Acropolis residents and staff to receive COVID-19 vaccine

Prince Rupert long term care residents will receive the vaccine on Jan. 20

An outbreak of COVID-19 was declared on Jan. 19 at Acropolis Manor. The long-term care home also had an influenza outbreak nearly two years ago.
COVID-19 outbreak declared at Acropolis Manor

Prince Rupert long-term care home has four resident, three staff cases

Lax Kxeen Elementary School has two different active notices for potential COVID-19 exposure after three adult lab-confirmed cases of the virus were identified in Prince Rupert schools, School District 52 released in a statement on Jan. 18. (Photo K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Three adult COVID-19 cases result in four potential exposures in city schools

Prince Rupert School District 52 calls special open meeting

The Port of Prince Rupert has experienced another year of increased cargo volumes, shipped through the city, with more than $50 billion in international trade facilitated through the area, the Port Authority announced on Jan. 18. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Port cargo volume growth continues despite pandemic obstacles

Prince Rupert Port authority announces $50 billion in international trade

Prince Rupert Lions Club donated $11,500 to several local organizations from the proceeds of the 28th annual Blue Knuckle Derby on Jan. 18. (Photo: supplied)
Local organizations benefit from Blue Knuckle Derby

Prince Rupert Lions Club donates $11,500

Syringe is prepared with one of B.C.’s first vials of Pfizer vaccine to prevent COVID-19, Victoria, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 caseload stays steady with 465 more Tuesday

No new outbreaks in health care facilities, 12 more deaths

New Westminster TV production designer, Rick Whitfield, has designed an office in a box for British Columbians in need of a private workspace. (BC Box Office photo)
PHOTOS: B.C. man designs ‘box office’ solution for those working from home

‘A professionally designed workspace on your property, away from the distractions of home’

Chilliwack ER doctor Marc Greidanus is featured in a video, published Jan. 18, 2021, where he demonstrates and describes effectiveness of various styles of masks. (Youtube)
VIDEO: Emergency room doctor runs through pros and cons of various masks

‘We’ve been asked to wear a mask and it’s not that hard,’ Greidanus says.

(Pixabay photo)
VIDEO: Tip to Metro Vancouver transit police helps woman 4,000 km away in Ohio

Sgt. Clint Hampton says transit police were alerted to a YouTube video of the woman in mental distress

A woman types on her laptop in Miami in a Monday, Dec. 12, 2016, photo illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Wilfredo Lee
British Columbia government lax on cybersecurity practices, auditor reports

The audit did not highlight a specific threat, but it found breaches in cybersecurity are increasing globally

Cranbrook Food Bank coordinator Deanna Kemperman, Potluck Cafe Society executive director Naved Noorani and Sunshine Coast Community Services Society executive director Catherine Leach join B.C.’s new Municipal Affairs Minister Josie Osborne on a video call about B.C. gaming grants, Jan. 19, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C. gaming grants reorganized for COVID-19 priorities

Minister highlights community kitchens, food banks

(Pixabay photo)
‘Cocaine bananas’ arrive at Kelowna grocery stores after mix up from Colombia: RCMP

Kelowna RCMP recently concluded an international drug investigation after finding cocaine in local grocers’ banana shipments in 2019

A new video from NCCIH and BC Northern Health titled ‘Healing in Pandemic Times: Indigenous Peoples, Stigma and COVID-19’ was animated by Joanne Gervais. (Photo Provided By: NCCIH Archives)
VIDEO: Stigma against Indigenous people is a ‘social sickness’

A new short animated video is aiming to educate the public on the stigmatization

A pinniped was attacked by an unseen predator off the shores of Dallas Road Monday night. (Courtesy of Steffani Cameron)
VIDEO: Seal hunting, not being hunted in video shot off Victoria waterfront

Victoria woman captures footage of pinniped activity off Dallas Road

Most Read