Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland delivers the federal budget in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Monday April 19, 2021. The federal government unveiled spending plans to manage the remainder of the COVID-19 crisis and chart an economic course for a post-pandemic Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland delivers the federal budget in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Monday April 19, 2021. The federal government unveiled spending plans to manage the remainder of the COVID-19 crisis and chart an economic course for a post-pandemic Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Federal Budget 2021: Liberals pledge $18 billion for Indigenous communities

More than $4 billion in COVID-19 funding announced for Indigenous communities

The federal Liberal government plans to spend more than $18 billion over the next five years to try to narrow the socio-economic gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and to help these communities fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said in her budget speech the government has made progress in righting the historic wrongs in Canada’s relationship with Indigenous Peoples, but a lot of work remains be done.

“It’s important to note that Indigenous Peoples have led the way in battling COVID,” Freeland said. “Their success is a credit to Indigenous leadership and self-governance.”

In its 2021 budget blueprint, the government says the new funding for Indigenous Peoples will address inequalities they continue to face in Canada and advance reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis.

The government says Indigenous communities have faced extraordinary health challenges since the start of the pandemic and continue to be vulnerable to the novel coronavirus and its variants.

The budget pledges to provide Indigenous communities with an additional $1.2 billion this fiscal year to support their response to COVID-19 pandemic including money to hire nurses, provide mental health assistance, address food insecurity and support children.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government has announced more than $4 billion in COVID-19 funding for Indigenous communities and organizations supporting them since the beginning of the pandemic.

Part of Monday’s budget pledge is $1.4 billion over five years to maintain essential health care services for First Nations and Inuit, to continue work to transform First Nations health systems and to respond to the health impacts of climate change.

The government promises to provide $1 billion over five years to increase funding under the First Nations child and family services program.

The budget also promises to invest an additional $2.2 billion over five years to address the roots of the tragedy of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

The government proposes to spend more than $6 billion for infrastructure in Indigenous communities including funding for clean water projects, housing and other community infrastructure projects.

Trudeau’s government has failed to deliver on its 2015 promise to end all drinking water advisories in First Nations communities by March 2021.

As of April 9, 52 long-term drinking water advisories remain in effect in 33 First Nation communities across the country.

The government says it’s still committed to ending all remaining advisories without providing a new deadline.

Maan Alhmidi, The Canadian Press

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