Diver Sean Smyrichinsky holds up aquatic wildlife on a recent trip to waters off of Banks Island. Smyrichinsky is helping the Canadian Navy try to find a lost bomb from 1950.

Diver joins navy in search for missing Mark IV bomb

A diver who reported a suspicious object underwater near Banks Island has embarked on a mission with the navy to find it

A diver who reported a suspicious object underwater near Banks Island has embarked on a mission with the navy to find the missing bomb that disappeared in 1950.

Sean Smyrichinsky didn’t have a GPS with him when he spotted the peculiar object that he described to be larger than a king-sized bed with basketball-sized holes in its round shape.

“I couldn’t figure out how it could have gotten there,” he said.

He was diving for sea cucumbers in early October, and a couple weeks later when they were finished fishing, and he had access to the Internet, he Googled the Mark IV bomb that went missing and saw a striking similarity with the strange object he’d seen.

Then he contacted a friend in the military, who put him in touch with the navy in Esquimalt. “They called and interviewed me and a couple days later they called me back and said they were going to send a ship and asked me to join them and show them what I had found.”

Over the weekend, the HMCS Yellowknife came to Prince Rupert to bring Smyrichinsky on board for the mission. The navy is deploying a remote operating vehicle (ROV) to sweep the ocean floor in search for the bomb. There are also two bomb experts onboard with them from the Fleet Diving Unit Pacific.

Lieutenant Navy Greg Menzies, of Maritime Forces Public Affairs, stated it will be a challenge to find the exact location of the object. Smyrichinsky will be the eyes and ears of their mission to guide them to the exact vicinity of the object.

“If they do come across this object then they’ll be able to identify exactly what it is and once the ship comes back to Esquimalt later this month they’ll analyze the footage and determine what they can or should do,” Menzies said.

If the object is found and it imposes an environmental hazard or a risk to the public they’ll recover it. The missing Mark IV bomb, once lost by a U.S. aircraft, has been at the bottom of the ocean for 60 years and weighed up to 10,900 lbs when intact.

“It’s not a nuclear weapon of any sorts, that’s been determined by the U.S. Navy. However, we’re going to go and see if we can identify it and maybe put a tap to this historic story,” Menzies said.

 

Just Posted

Rainmakers dominate Caledonia

Rainmakers win first of two games 71-31

Teams set for All Native tournament

The 51-team field features 39 automatic qualifiers and 12 qualifying teams

Sports briefs

Here’s what’s going on in Prince Rupert sports this weekend

PART I: How Prince Rupert schools teach Indigenous language to hundreds of students

A multimedia series with videos and photos from children’s Sm’algyax classes on B.C.’s North Coast

Rent continues to rise in Prince Rupert, drops in Terrace

A report from Canadian Mortage and Housing Corporation shows the average rent has risen by $132

Heart of Our City: A fisherman with two loves

Norm Ostrom has owned one boat in his life — Arne A. — for almost 60 years

Carriers wanted for the Northern View

We have open routes for carriers all over Prince Rupert

B.C. woman brain injured in crash as a baby gets $1.1 million in damages

Trial heard the woman was 16 months old, being carried by her mother when they were both hit

Court denies WestJet’s bid to toss out discrimination lawsuit of former worker

Mandalena Lewis is suing WestJet over allegations of gender-based discrimination

VIDEO: 3 months later, rescued sea lion released back into ocean

The young animal was found in Campbell River three months ago

Sagmoen neighbours recall alleged hammer attack

Woman was screaming outside Maple Ridge townhouse in 2013

Accused B.C. drug smuggler to be extradited

Supreme Court of Canada upholds extradition order for accused Shuswap drug smuggler, Colin Martin

One convicted, two cleared in 2014 deaths of men in B.C.’s Cariboo

Andrew Jongbloets convicted of manslaughter in deaths of Matthew Hennigar, 23 and Kalvin Andy, 22

AHUS patient Shantee Anaquod is home for Christmas

Less than a month after receiving first dose of $750K drug, 23 year old healthy enough to go home

Most Read