A Manitoba man convicted of sending bombs to his ex-wife and two lawyers will learn how long he will be behind bars today. Guido Amsel, 49, is shown in this undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Winnipeg Police Service

Convicted Winnipeg letter-bomber sentenced to life in prison

Guido Amsel sent letter bombs to his ex-wife and two law firms

A Manitoba man who sent letter bombs to his ex-wife and two law firms that had represented her has been sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for at least 10 years.

Guido Amsel, who was convicted earlier this year on four counts of attempted murder, has also been sentenced to an additional 12 years for an earlier attempt on his ex-wife’s life.

Amsel, who is 52, sent letter bombs to his former wife, Iris, and two Winnipeg lawyers who represented her in the summer of 2015.

One of the devices went off and severely injured lawyer Maria Mitousis, who lost her right hand in the explosion.

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Amsel testified during his trial that he was being set up by his former wife and others and that evidence had been planted against him.

Provincial court Judge Tracey Lord said Amsel has not accepted responsibility or shown any remorse for the attacks that put many people at risk.

“He showed not only a callous and vengeful intent toward the specific targets of the devices, but also an indiscriminate disregard for the lives and safety of others in the community,” Lord said Thursday.

“He has not taken responsibility for his actions and … moreover, he has attempted to place responsibility on others for these offences, and alleges corruption at all levels of the justice system.”

The bomb that injured Mitousis was placed in a recording device. A note attached to it instructed her to press the enter button, which set off the explosion.

Mitousis told court in her victim impact statement earlier this year that Amsel’s actions were that of a coward.

“I wear the scars of the explosion on my face and on my body,” she told court at the time.

RELATED: Man accused of mailing bomb to his brother in B.C. has died

She said after the sentencing was over she planned to move on with her life, continue her return to work and put Amsel behind her.

“After this is over, I will forget him and he will disappear from my consciousness.”

Kelly Geraldine Malone, The Canadian Press

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