Aerial view of the former Terrace Co-op site along Greig Ave. in downtown Terrace. The City of Terrace owns the parcel and is looking for a developer to buy and build a multi-faceted project at the location. (Photo courtesy City of Terrace)

Aerial view of the former Terrace Co-op site along Greig Ave. in downtown Terrace. The City of Terrace owns the parcel and is looking for a developer to buy and build a multi-faceted project at the location. (Photo courtesy City of Terrace)

City of Terrace leaps into real estate market

Expects that Canada LNG project will spark developer interest

For decades the Terrace Co-operative Association’s shopping complex along Greig Ave. in downtown Terrace was a hub of activity — containing a food store, hardware store, gasbar, insurance agency, hairdresser, cafeteria and more — only to fall victim in the late 1990s to a sudden decline in the region’s forest economy and to changing shopping habits.

But with the complex long since demolished the property’s current owner, the City of Terrace, hopes to attract a developer to buy the property and bring it back to life through a blend of commercial space and residential accommodation.

Requests for proposals closed Nov. 30, a date that’s not lost on Danielle Myles, the city’s economic development officer, coming as it is just one month after LNG Canada gave the thumbs up to its $40 billion natural gas liquefaction project in Kitimat.

“It wasn’t really planned that way,” says Myles of the closing date, noting that the city received environmental clearance for the property from the provincial government just this year. “But with the [LNG Canada] project in a positive final investment decision, we know it’s spurring a lot of interest in Terrace from developers.”

Up for sale is the majority of the land — 2.78 acres —on which the shopping complex once sat. A corner lot on the northwestern end of the property was sold some years back to a group hoping to build a brewpub. That project has now been shelved and the lot is also up for sale.

The city is also keeping a section on the eastern end of the property across the street from the Best Western Hotel to itself with a view to developing a public-use space and, eventually, a museum building in conjunction with the Terrace and District Museum Society.

That’s going to be a long-term project inasmuch as the Co-op’s gasbar once sat there, meaning a comprehensive environmental mitigation program will need to be put in place first.

Myles said the city is looking for a developer to blend in its ideas for commercial and residential development with the public space and museum concept.

It’s also placing value on ideas to recognize both First Nations and pioneer heritage and culture.

“This reflects the community’s input of what they want to see on the property,” said Myles of a community task force report commissioned concerning the future of the property.

An eventual purchaser also has the benefit of a city tax credit program to stimulate development with the downtown core and, depending upon how it structures its residential component, can apply for financial help through the city’s affordable housing fund, she added.

While the city has the former Co-op lands on the market, it also closed off requests for proposals on Nov. 30 for another piece of property it owns —just under 15.5 acres bounded by the CN line to the north, Kenney Ave. on the east and Keith Ave. to the south in the light industrial area of the city’s Southside.

That property also has an environmental clean bill of health from the province based on past use mostly as a log storage yard for a sawmill near the Sande Overpass along Keith Ave. It was closed in the mid-2000s and subsequently dismantled.

Here the city is looking for a developer to follow its Keith Estates Neighbourhood Concept Plan for the area, calling for a mix of light industrial and commercial uses.

The prospect of new light industrial and commercial uses has already taken hold with the purchase from the city several years ago of an adjacent lot on the corner of Keith and Kenney by the local Toyota dealership, which is planned to move there from its current location on Hwy16.

Although the city has set a timeline of April 30, 2019 to complete the sale of both the former Terrace Co-op land and the Keith and Kenney property with development to start shortly thereafter, Myles said it is more than prepared to wait until the right developers with the right proposals surface.

“We’re not in a hurry,” she said, adding that as the full surge of the LNG Canada development becomes evident next year, there’ll be even more interest in expanding Terrace’s role as a services hub for the northwest.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Rose Sawka, 91, reaches out to her son Terry Sawka, on a daily visit through the window, from inside Acropolis Manor where a COVID-19 outbreak took hold on Jan 19. Rose was vaccinated for the virus on Jan. 20 and as of Feb. 25 has remained virus free. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
No increases of COVID-19 at Acropolis -16 residents now recovered

Vaccinations have helped to stabilize Prince Rupert long-term care facility virus numbers

A health care worker prepares to test a Coastal GasLink field worker for COVID-19. (Coastal GasLink photo)
Coastal GasLink begins COVID screening of pipeline workers

Construction is once again ramping up following Northern Health approval of COVID management plan

BC Bus North was implemented under the NDP provincial government in 2018 when Greyhound cancelled services across northern BC. The transportation funding expires at the end of March 2021. (Photo: B.C. Transit)
BC Liberals call for immediate govt. renewal of BC Bus North funding

BC Liberals spent years ignoring need for better transportation in the North - Jennifer Rice, MLA

Prince Rupert Tourism is benefitting from funding for new welcome and wayfinding signage from the COVID-19 Community Economic Recovery Infrastructure Program. McClymont Park on the gateway into Prince Rupert is one of the first things tourists see entering the city by road. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
$695,000 Community Economic Recovery funds to benefit local organizations

Prince Rupert Tourism and Gitga’at Development Corporation to receive COVID-19 recovery funds

Wainwright Marine Services Ltd.’s “Ingenika” tugboat went missing in the Garner Canal area south and east of Kitimat on Feb. 11, resulting in two deaths and the rescue of a third man. (Wainwright Marine Photo)
Tug union demands Transport Canada protect workers along B.C. coast and rivers

ILWU makes safety demands following the deaths of two men and the rescue of a third

A health worker holds a vial of AstraZeneca vaccine to be administered to members of the police at a COVID-19 vaccination center in Mainz, Germany, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. The federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate, start with the vaccination of police officers in internal police vaccination centers. (Andreas Arnold/dpa via AP)
B.C. officials to unveil new details of COVID vaccination plan Monday

Seniors and health-care workers who haven’t gotten their shot are next on the list

An investigation is underway after a man was shot and killed by Tofino RCMP in Opitsaht. (Black Press Media file photo)
Man shot and killed by RCMP near Tofino, police watchdog investigating

Investigation underway by Independent Investigations Office of British Columbia.

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday December 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C.’s compromise on in-person worship at three churches called ‘absolutely unacceptable’

Would allow outdoor services of 25 or less by Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack churches

Baldy Mountain Resort was shut down on Saturday after a fatal workplace accident. (Baldy Mountain picture)
Jasmine and Gwen Donaldson are part of the CAT team working to reduce stigma for marginalized groups in Campbell River. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror
Jasmine’s story: Stigma can be the hardest hurdle for those overcoming addiction

Recovering B.C. addict says welcome, connection and community key for rebuilding after drug habit

A Vancouver restaurant owner was found guilty of violating B.C.’s Human Rights Code by discriminating against customers on the basis of their race. (Pixabay)
Vancouver restaurant owner ordered to pay $4,000 to customers after racist remark

Referring to patrons as ‘you Arabs’ constitutes discrimination under B.C.’s Human Rights Code, ruling deems

Nanaimo children’s author and illustrator Lindsay Ford’s latest book is ‘Science Girl.’ (Photo courtesy Lindsay Ford)
B.C. children’s writer encourages girls to pursue the sciences in new book

Lindsay Ford is holding a virtual launch for latest book, ‘Science Girl’

Pig races at the 145th annual Chilliwack Fair on Aug. 12, 2017. Monday, March 1, 2021 is Pig Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Feb. 28 to March 6

Pig Day, Canadian Bacon Day and Grammar Day are all coming up this week

Staff from the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre, passersby, RCMP and Nanaimo Fire Rescue carried a sick 300-kilogram steller sea lion up the steep bluff at Invermere Beach in north Nanaimo in an attempt to save the animal’s life Thursday. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Rescue Centre)
300-kilogram sea lion muscled up from B.C. beach in rescue attempt

Animal dies despite efforts of Nanaimo marine mammal rescue team, emergency personnel and bystanders

Most Read