The Sixth Avenue Bridge is one of two old wooden bridges that will need to be replaced at a cost of between $7 million and $9 million.

The Sixth Avenue Bridge is one of two old wooden bridges that will need to be replaced at a cost of between $7 million and $9 million.

City hoping for grant money

The City of Prince Rupert hopes that by applying for grants it will be able to check off a few major projects on its wish list.

The City of Prince Rupert hopes that by applying for grants it will be able to check off a few major projects on its wish list.

The city’s engineering department recommended requesting grants from two funding sources to help complete some of its to-do projects and to minimize the costs for taxpayers.

The city will apply for money from the New Building Canada Fund – Small Communities Fund (NBCF-SCF) Program, launched by the provincial and federal governments to support infrastructure projects in communities with less than 100,000 people, and the Gas Tax General Strategic Priorities Fund, open to local governments outside of the Greater Vancouver Regional District, with funding streams to support infrastructure and capacity building projects.

Council approved asking for assistance from both programs for its raw water supply project, a complete replacement of the city’s raw water supply. Council agreed to appoint the estimated $15-16 million project as its priority for any funding it many receive.

“None of these projects are guaranteed (to be funded) at this time. Strategically, we feel that the raw water supply project is the number one priority for the City of Prince Rupert,” Richard Pucci, engineering coordinator, said.

Second on the priority list is the Landfill Development Project, which would see the creation of a new cell at the landfill. The city will apply for financial support for the $7-million project from NBCF-SCF.

Through the same program, the City of Prince Rupert is asking for help to replace the old wooden trestle bridges on Second Avenue West and Sixth Avenue East, expected to cost between $7-9 million each.

Furthermore, the city is requesting funding from the Gas Tax General Strategic Priorities Fund to complete the first phase of its asset management, estimated at $100,000.