Smoke billows up from a container fire at Port Metro Vancouver's Centennial Pier.

Smoke billows up from a container fire at Port Metro Vancouver's Centennial Pier.

Chemicals similar to those responsible for Vancouver port fire also handled at Fairview Terminal

It is a container terminal not unlike Fairview Terminal, but on March 4, Centennial Pier was covered by a plume of chemical smoke.

It is a container terminal not unlike Fairview Terminal, but on March 4, Centennial Pier was covered by a plume of chemical smoke that pushed many in Vancouver off the streets.

On that afternoon, a container carrying trichloroisocyanuric acid suddenly burst into flames launching a hazardous materials incident that prompted warnings from Coastal Health for people to stay indoors and breathe through a wet towel if necessary.

The fire had many in Prince Rupert wondering if such an incident could occur here.

Michael Gurney of the Prince Rupert Port Authority told the Northern View that chemicals similar to the one responsible for that fire have been making their way through Fairview.

Irrespective of the quantity, however, it’s important to note that we ship a variety of cargos in the same class as trichloroisocyanuric acid,” he said, noting none of that specific chemical has been shipped through Prince Rupert.

Gurney said trichloroisocyanuric acid and other such materials are closely monitored as they make their way to the North Coast.

“All shipments of dangerous goods are reviewed and regulated by the Prince Rupert Port Authority in advance of vessel arrivals. The Harbour Master’s office maintains awareness of the nature and location of containerized dangerous goods during their passage through Prince Rupert — including any cargo that stays on the vessel, bound for other ports of call,” he explained.

~ With files from Jeff Nagel