Bernier says abortion, gender identity not on People’s Party of Canada platform

At issue is former Christian talk-show host Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson’s candidacy in Burnaby South

People’s Party Leader Maxime Bernier says his party’s policies will not include anything to do with abortion or gender identity, despite the fact its first candidate besides him is a vocal social conservative.

Bernier is defending the appointment of former Christian talk-show host Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson to be the Burnaby South byelection candidate for the party he founded after parting ways with the Conservative party in August.

READ MORE: Bernier’s People’s Party of Canada arrives in the Fraser Valley

In an interview, Tyler Thompson said her foray into politics began in 2017 when she learned about a B.C. government policy to teach sexual orientation and gender identity in elementary schools. She campaigned hard against the policy, running for the local school board in Burnaby last fall with that as her main issue.

She finished 11th out of 13 candidates but said she got enough votes to convince her she was speaking for a “silent majority” who stay quiet so they aren’t called bigots but feel the way she does about not exposing children to an ideology at school.

“I got 15,622 votes,” she said. “The other side was extremely surprised.”

Bernier said any of his candidates is free to speak out against abortion or gender identity but their views will not be the party’s policy.

“That’s all personal belief but it is not part of our campaign,” he said. “She understands that she will fight for our platform and being sure we will be able to implement our bold reform.”

That platform is the same one he used to campaign for the Conservative leadership in 2017, including phasing out supply management for food products, reducing the number of immigrants Canada accepts and stopping all government subsidies and handouts to businesses in favour of cutting their taxes.

Bernier has marched in pride parades and is also known to be pro-choice. In 2016, he voted in favour of Bill C-16, which added gender identity and expression to be protected under the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Thursday, he would not say where he stands on the issue of teaching gender identity in schools because that is a provincial issue.

“I don’t have to have a stance on that,” he said.

Tyler Thompson said she isn’t against anybody who says they are transgender or gay or lesbian, but she feels strongly that nothing on those subjects should be taught in schools. When she said so publicly, she said, she was attacked and that is what motivates her now to campaign for the freedom to express her beliefs.

“I was having a good life and having a lot of lattes and living the dream and then I became the target,” she said. “But I’m not a bigot. I’m not a homophobe. I’m not a transphobe.”

Tyler Thompson herself has called fighting the curriculum her “hill to die on,” but said she doesn’t feel she has to bring that fight to the federal party because there are others who are now taking up that cause, including in Alberta and Ontario.

The party’s candidates for other February byelections in Ontario and Quebec are likely to be named next week. A fourth candidate, Jennifer Clarke, is named to run in Nanaimo-Ladysmith, recently vacated by NDP MP Sheila Malcolmson, but there is no byelection there yet.

Just Posted

Case closed on an illustrious career

Judge Herman Seidemann retiring after over 40 years serving the law in Prince Rupert

Council briefs: Moby Dick owner publicly speaks to Prince Rupert council about her goats

Council heard arguments supporting municipal voting for permanent residents

Researchers to flush Skeena with bright dyes for spill-response study

Kitsumkalum leading effort as rail transport of hazardous materials on the rise

UPDATE: Fate of last house standing from Third Ave. fire in hands of insurance

The second home, located at 941 Third Ave., was demolished due to safety concerns

Tahltan reach benefits agreement over Seabridge’s massive KSM gold mine project

$308M agreement provides additional billions for Tahltan jobs, contracts

Prince Rupert sea cadets voyage into a new chapter at their Annual Ceremonial Review

Mayor Lee Brain acted as review officer at the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corp 7 Captain Cook ACR

‘Text neck’ causing bone spurs to grow from millennials’ skulls, researchers say

Technology use from early childhood causing abnormal bone growths in 41 per cent of young adults

B.C. teen killed by fallen tree on field trip remembered as hero

13-year-old Tai Caverhill was the first to spot the tree falling and warned his friends

Surrey RCMP raises Pride flag amid din of protesters

There were about 30 protesters on either side, and 20 Mounties doing crowd control

Should B.C. get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

The province wants to know, as state governments down south make the move

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Canadians crash out of Women’s World Cup in 0-1 loss to Sweden

Canada missed a chance to tie the game on a penalty shot

Four-year-old boy assaulted at B.C. soccer game

It happened at a weekend tournament in Ashcroft

B.C. residents rethinking summer road trips due to gas prices

63 per cent of respondents reported gas prices are impacting their day-to-day finances

Most Read