BC Conservation Officer Service is investigating the killing of a black bear that was left whole and then burned on a fire pit in a Shuswap gravel pit weeks later. (File photo)

Bear shot, later burned in Shuswap gravel pit, sparking B.C. Conservation officers probe

A black bear killed and dumped in a Tappen gravel pit in mid-April, says BC COS.

WARNING: This story contains an image which some people may find disturbing

A black bear killed and dumped in a Tappen gravel pit just off a main road has been concerning passersby and keeping the BC Conservation Officers Service searching for leads since mid April.

Conservation Officer Mike Richardson first got the call about the bear which had been dumped in a pit off Skimikin Lake Road on April 16 or 17. Richardson said the bear had been shot.

READ MORE: District grant helps residents and staff in Sicamous seniors facilities stay safe and connected

READ MORE: Salmon Arm’s RJ Haney heritage park closed but not sitting idle

A lawful spring hunting season on black bears runs from April 1 to June 30 in the area where the dead bear was found. Richardson said the dead bear was left whole, which is in violation of the law that requires hunters to remove all edible portions of the animal.

Richardson said the other possible explanation for a bear with a bullet in it is that it was shot by someone protecting themselves or their property. He said the COs are still looking for the person responsible if this was the case, because incidents where animals are destroyed for protection must be reported to them.

READ MORE: Newborn feral foal euthanized after fall

READ MORE: Stober family makes donation to support training of Okanagan’s frontline workers

The story got stranger and the calls to conservation officers continued as April drew to a close. Richardson said they began receiving calls about the bear again when someone dragged it onto a fire pit and burned the weeks-old carcass. One caller was concerned that the animal had been tortured but Richardson said the person or people who killed the bear and those who burned it are almost certainly separate groups.

Richardson said the Conservation Officer Service appreciates when the public reports suspicious dumped animal carcasses. He urged anyone who is disposing of legally killed animals to do so well away from places frequented by the public. Even discarded bones and hides generate concern from the public and calls to the COs. He said discarded wildlife can also draw dangerous animals to populated areas.



jim.elliot@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

bearsConservation

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

BC Conservation Officer Service is investigating the killing of a black bear that was left whole and then burned on a fire pit in a Shuswap gravel pit weeks later. (Shandy Sim/Facebook)

Comments are closed

Just Posted

QUIZ: Put your knowledge of Canada to the test

How much do you know about our country?

AGM takes centre stage

Lester Centre presented annual reports on June 24

Evictions to resume

Landlords with existing orders can file for enforcement on July 2nd

Province supports emergency preparedness in communities

It’s not ‘if’ an emergency will happen but ‘when’

Teachers run this town

Staff at PRMS complete a physical education of the city by walking each street in Prince Rupert

‘This year is unlike any other’: Trudeau delivers Canada day address

Sophie Gregoire Trudeau and the Prime Minister release video celebrating the national holiday

PHOTOS: Dual rallies take over Legislature lawn on Canada Day

Resist Canada 153 highlighted colonization and genocide, Unify the People called COVID a hoax

Gov. General honours Canadians for bravery, volunteer service

Five categories of winners presented on Canada Day

COVID-19: Should non-medical masks be mandatory in Canada?

New poll shows Canadians are divided on the rules around mandatory masks

‘A little bit scary for everybody’: Air passengers wary as new rules take effect

Masks or face coverings have been mandatory on flights since April 20

VIDEO: Prince William and Kate chat with B.C. hospital staff about COVID-19

Seven-minute video posted to Youtube on Canada Day

River centre says heavy rains could bring flooding to central, northeastern B.C.

Water levels are already unusually high and river banks can be extremely unstable

Most Read