B.C. teacher suspended after leaving box of carving knives in classroom

He was also punished for letting his students run in a park unsupervised

A Peace River teacher was suspended without pay after he left a box of carving knives unattended in his classroom, and in a separate incident allowed students to run around a park alone during a P.E. class.

According the B.C. Teacher Regulation Branch, Richard Andy George Roderick Payne left an unsecured box of 20 carving knives in his classroom on May 3, 2017.

His students had unlimited access to the knives for about two hours until the principal and another teacher found them and took them out of the room.

When Payne couldn’t find the knives, he didn’t report it to the school.

A few days later, on May 9, he allowed his physical education class to go on a run in a public park with no supervision.

The kids ran for anywhere from seven minutes to half an hour while Payne waited on a bench back at the school for his students to return.

When questioned about it by officials with the Peace River South School District, Payne said he hadn’t supervised a run for years.

As a result of both infractions, the district has issued him a letter of discipline, suspended him for four days without pay, and ordered him to take a course on creating a positive learning environment.

Payne appears to still have his teacher’s certificate, even though he has been disciplined many times before.

In March 2011, he was reprimanded after admitting he pulled a student from his chair and hit him in the arm.

In October of the same year, he was again reprimanded following allegations that he’d broken a metre stick over a student’s back.

In 2012, Payne was issued a letter of discipline after allegations of inappropriate physical contact with students.

In 2014, Payne was suspended for one day after allegations of physical contact with a student.

A BC Teacher Regulation Branch magazine said that the 2014 offence involved grabbing female Grade 8 student’s face and blowing on her nose, making her “very uncomfortable.”

Some of the previous offences included “joking around, poking or mock tasering students and hugging a student.”


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Transition Society hosts exhibit on addiction portrayed through art

Prince Rupert show gave artists an opportunity to express how they view addiction

Wind warning for northwest B.C.

Environment Canada states 80-100 kilometre per hour winds expected until the afternoon

Trailer comes off its hitch on McBride

Morning traffic in Prince Rupert while the crane truck lifted its trailer back on the vehicle

Where are the crosswalk upgrades in Prince Rupert?

New LED lights and countdown timers are expected to be installed this winter

PHOTOS and VIDEO: Rupert recognizes 100 days since Armistice

Residents surrounded the cenotaph on the courthouse lawns on Remembrance Day

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Delivering the paper as a family

The Northern View is looking for newspaper carriers in Prince Rupert, join our team today

West Fraser to reduce sawmill production in Quesnel, Fraser Lake

The move will affect 75 employees in Quesnel, 60 in Fraser Lake

Kuhnhackl scores 2 odd goals as Isles dump Canucks 5-2

Vancouver drops second game in two nights

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Most Read