Parksville Beach Festival attendees take in the Quality Foods fireworks display during the Beach Fest finale in 2017. (Adam Kveton/PQB News)

Are New Year’s Eve fireworks ‘selfish, incredibly intrusive’?

Parksville resident says her New Year’s Eve was ruined by loud displays

Some people want to ring in the New Year with a bang, while others wish the fireworks were left behind long ago.

In a letter sent to the Parksville-Qualicum Beach News, Parksville resident Pauline McLeod said her New Year’s Eve — one she had hoped to be peaceful — was “shattered by intermittent fireworks.”

RELATED: Fireworks misery on New Year’s Eve

McLeod said her little dog was frantic while fireworks were being set off and was “impossible to comfort.”

“I couldn’t enjoy my quiet celebration with my dog being miserable,” McLeod wrote. “Please, people who set off fireworks, think of the thousands upon thousands of seniors and pets who are suffering for your brief, selfish, incredibly intrusive entertainment.”

McLeod believes fireworks are an outdated tradition and should be banned, but if it won’t be made illegal, “we can make it socially unacceptable.”

A City of Parksville bylaw states that “no person may hold, possess, store, discharge, or otherwise use display fireworks without a fireworks event permit.” The sale of them is banned as well.

City spokesperson Deb Tardiff said no permits were applied for or issued. No complaints were received and no tickets were issued.

Anyone wanting to set off fireworks in Parksville must apply for and receive a fireworks event permit and all applicants must hold a current and valid Fireworks Supervisor and/or Pyrotechnics Certification card as issued by Natural Resources Canada.

The bylaw says fireworks events need to end prior to 11 p.m. and may not start prior to 8 a.m.

Anyone who disobeys the rules could get a fine of up to $10,000 or time behind bars.

Karly.Blats@pqbnews.com

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