Several families united in solidarity last week after one group, consisting of mixed-race individuals, was evicted from Wrights Beach campground on alleged noise complaints. Just after the group was evicted, they posted together for a photo. Just days before, they were strangers to each other. Now, lifelong friends. (Submitted)

Several families united in solidarity last week after one group, consisting of mixed-race individuals, was evicted from Wrights Beach campground on alleged noise complaints. Just after the group was evicted, they posted together for a photo. Just days before, they were strangers to each other. Now, lifelong friends. (Submitted)

Alleged racially-motivated eviction from Okanagan campground sparks outcry

“It was wrong and it needs to be addressed,” says neighbour after mixed-race family evicted

When the only mixed-race group at Wrights Beach Camp in Penticton was evicted from their campsite for alleged noise complaints, those in neighbouring sites couldn’t help but question why.

Andrea Klaver and her group, which consisted of three mixed-race families from the Vancouver area, had set up camp at their beachfront site beside Monica Thiessen and her family, as well as Steve Wikkerink and his family from the Central and North Okanagan. Both groups arrived at the two sites on Saturday, Aug. 29, and were planning on staying for a week.

From the perspective of Wikkerink and Thiessen, it’s alleged Klaver’s group was not only treated unfairly but possibly targeted because of the colour of their skin. Among Klaver’s group were seven Black children and two Black men.

The eviction came after a series of alleged noise complaints against Klaver and her group, several days before they were due to leave.

“Was a racial slur ever said? No. But when you’re treated differently, and you’re the only Black people there, I think, you know, assumptions can be made… it’s really disgusting,” said Klaver.

One of the men in Klaver’s group was playing some tropical tunes on the beach in the afternoon. Wikkerink found the music relaxing and enjoyable; he noticed others around him must have liked the melody as he spotted an older couple, on the other side of Klaver’s site, dancing together. However, that night, the group was given a noise complaint.

“We could just make out what the songs were, and we were just beside them. Never at any point would I ever say they were excessively loud with it (music) whatsoever. In all honesty, I would have never thought that they would have gotten a noise complaint about the sound of their music,” said Wikkerink.

The next night, at about 6 p.m., Klaver’s group was again told to turn off their music. Wikkerink said this surprised them, as they were also playing music in their site, possibly louder and were not spoken to. Throughout Wikkerink’s time at the campground he said his group did not receive a single comment, warning or noise complaint.

“We had a tiny little speaker with soft music, and they came to us and said your music is way too loud, even though the people beside us were louder than us, we were the only ones singled out. It was a little weird,” said Klaver.

“The same thing happened every time – they would drive by our campsite and just glare into our campsite to see what we were doing. It was the most peculiar thing I’d ever seen.”

Again the following night at about 6 p.m., the campground owner visited Klaver’s site and demanded their turn their music off. Wikkerink stressed to him at the time that they weren’t bothering anyone, and that all of their families were enjoying themselves. However, he recalled the owner insisting he had received multiple complaints about Klaver and her group.

The following night again, the group received another noise complaint. Wikkerink again insisted their family didn’t hear the group beside them.

“I did not hear them, no music, no talking, no nothing,” he said.

By this point, children in the two campsites had gotten to know each other and were playing games throughout the day. Outside of the noise complaints, Wikkerink said Klaver’s children, the only children of colour in their group, were allegedly singled out from the other Caucasian children they were playing with.

“Our kids were all up on a hillside, there were other kids from the campground up there as well. Klaver’s kids were told to go back to their campsite… when they were told to get off that hillside, and all the other kids were fine to play there, we just couldn’t wrap our heads around it all,” said Wikkerink.

“It’s rather coincidental, but is it?” said Klaver about the incident.

This continued until the group was evicted from their site early Thursday morning.

The group of children who played together at Wrights Beach campground last week, pose for a photo just after one of the groups was evicted. (Submitted)

In response to a request for comment, Wrights Beach Camp representative Paul Lionello detailed the timestamps of warnings given to the party in question. He said loud music at any time is not tolerated, and that if their policies are ignored, customers may be asked to leave. He also detailed another eviction due to multiple noise warnings on Aug. 30.

The warnings, he explained, were given from August 29 through September 3, several times between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. as well as around 6 p.m.

Thiessen said she received the same response and denied that her neighbours were loud or disrespectful, especially this late at night.

“Their timeline is absolutely false, one hundred per cent,” she said. “They did not get the complaints like he said they did, that did not happen.”

Come Thursday morning Klaver was having her morning coffee outside when she was told they had to leave and that they were not welcome back.

“I was flabbergasted, like what?” said Klaver. “Several people tried to speak up for us because they realized we weren’t the loud ones, and the campground staff was completely unwilling to listen.”

She said news of their eviction spread quickly around the campground.

“People I’d never met before, adults, an old man came to me to hug me, and he was crying because he couldn’t believe that he witnessed what he witnessed. Countless campers came up to us to say how disgusted they were.”

Within 15 minutes of them departing their campsite that morning, Klaver said their campsite, and the one beside it was already filled with a new group.

“It is our belief that it was pre-planned to kick us out, and they had people waiting in the wings to take our spot,” she said.

Lionello furthered in his response that throughout this season, they have asked several customers to leave due to violations of their noise policy.

Wikkerink said their neighbours’ eviction was unexplainable. He and another parent say they tried to reason with the park authorities but their opinions were ignored.

This prompted Thiessen to pen a social media post about the incident, which has gained traction. As of Wednesday, Sept. 9, the post had close to 1000 shares.

“It was wrong. It was wrong and it needs to be addressed,” she said.

After the incident, two children in their group, 15 and 17 years old, were quite distraught.

“The word he (17-year-old boy) used over and over again, was that he was so embarrassed he got kicked out for being Black,” said Klaver. “Because they (kids) are raised to accept people and look at their personalities. He’s like, if I have a good personality, and I’m a nice kid, why does he hate me?”

She added that the Caucasian children in the group are also confused.

“It’s my understanding that… it’s not just our Black kids who are affected, but the white kids also, especially those from the Okanagan. They feel they’ve never really seen racism in front of their eyes before.”

In response to the alleged racism, Lionello said discrimination of any kind is against their values.

“Discrimination of any kind is against our values and policies both professionally and personally. We at Wright’s Beach Camp do our best to promote a positive experience for all of our guests and to ensure rules and/or enforcement thereof are communicated clearly, proactively and equally,” he said in an email.

Thiessen said that following her post, she has been private messaged by several mixed, bi-racial families that have also been evicted from Wrights Beach campground.

“Honestly I can’t say it’s racially motivated, but from my point of view looking at it, there’s no other justification for it.”

As for Thiessen and her group, who have been camping at Wrights Beach campground since 1998, say they will never return. Despite this being their family-favourite beach. Wikkerink echoed this.

Perhaps a silver lining, Wikkerink and Klaver both explained, is that they have made new lifelong friends. The families are already planning another time to meet up.

“Our kids are all friends on social media now… they are super close. It’s been really cool to see,” said Wikkerink. “We’ll probably be friends with them for a very, very long time. I don’t see that ever-changing. I think that it came down to a group of people that stood up for each other, helped each other out, and worked each other through a crappy turn of events.”

@PentictonNews
editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

racism

Just Posted

Joseph Albert Brooks, 94-years-young pf Prince Rupert offers traditional prayers and smudging to the sick. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Heart of our City: Joseph Albert Brooks keeps smudging and praying for others

94-year-old Tsimshian elder just wants some help washing his floors

Land along Prince Rupert’s waterfront, PID 012-247-391, where residents say excessive industrial train noise is stemming from, has been found to be owned by the City of Prince Rupert and is not federal land like first presented, Prince Rupert Environmental Society stated on June 17. (Image: supplied by Land Title and Survey, Govt. of BC.)
Error found on land titles map may assist city with noise control enforcement of industry

Prince Rupert residents had been told there was no municipal jurisdiction to enforce noise bylaws

Department of Oceans and Fisheries has announced as of July 19 chinook salmon is not to be fished in certain areas in BC tidal waters until July. Spring chinook salmon are seen swimming. (Photo courtesy Michael Humling, US Fish & Wildlife Service)
Chinook Salmon limits set to zero in some BC tidal waters

DFO implement restrictions to protect Chinook Salmon

Visitors to a pop-up temporary aquarium in Prince Rupert will have the chance to see marine ecology from July 21 to Aug. 15, like this viewer watching sea anemones at the Ripley’s Aquarium in Toronto. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Prince Rupert pop-up aquarium will bring sea level to eye level in July

A permanent peak to reef ecology centre is in the planning stages by North Coast Ecology Society

Prince Rupert’s Ellen Wright and Graeme Dickens jam out during filming the two Ring System Studio concerts to be broadcast on television during June. (Photo: supplied, H. Cox)
Ring System Studio sounds on television

Two concerts by the Prince Rupert music school will be broadcast in June

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
Fort St. John man arrested after allegedly inviting sexual touching from children

Two children reported the incident to a trusted adult right away

Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose behind vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines on the counter, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. An independent vaccine tracker website founded by a University of Saskatchewan student says just over 20 per cent of eligible Canadians — those 12 years old and above — are now fully vaccinated. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
At least 20% of eligible Canadians fully vaccinated, 75% with one dose: data

Earlier projections for reopening at this milestone didn’t include Delta variant

This undated file photo provided by Ernie Carswell & Partners shows the home featured in the opening and closing scenes of The Brady Bunch in Los Angeles. Do you know the occupation of Mike Brady, the father in this show about a blended family? (Anthony Barcelo/Ernie Carswell & Partners via AP, File)
QUIZ: A celebration of dad on Father’s Day

How much do you know about famous fathers?

Emily Steele holds up a collage of her son, 16-year-old Elijah-Iain Beauregard who was stabbed and killed in June 2019, outside of Kelowna Law Courts on June 18. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
Kelowna woman who fatally stabbed teen facing up to 1.5 years of jail time

Her jail sentence would be followed by an additional one to 1.5 years of supervision

Cpl. Scott MacLeod and Police Service Dog Jago. Jago was killed in the line of duty on Thursday, June 17. (RCMP)
Abbotsford police, RCMP grieve 4-year-old service dog killed in line of duty

Jago killed by armed suspect during ‘high-risk’ incident in Alberta

The George Road wildfire near Lytton, B.C., has grown to 250 hectares. (BC Wildfire Service)
B.C. drone sighting halts helicopters fighting 250 hectares of wildfire

‘If a drone collides with firefighting aircraft the consequences could be deadly,’ says BC Wildfire Service

A dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a vaccination site in Vancouver Thursday, March 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
NACI advice to mix vaccines gets varied reaction from AstraZeneca double-dosers

NACI recommends an mRNA vaccine for all Canadians receiving a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

A aerial view shows the debris going into Quesnel Lake caused by a tailings pond breach near the town of Likely, B.C., Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Updated tailings code after Mount Polley an improvement: B.C. mines auditor

British Columbia’s chief auditor of mines has found changes to the province’s requirements for tailings storage facilities

Most Read