Trinity Men’s Recovery House in Prince Rupert will receive $900,000 for publicly funded beds announced MLA Jennifer Rice on Feb. 9, 2021. Luke Dufour completes intakes and support work with residents at 333 Trinity House on July 11, 2020. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)

Trinity Men’s Recovery House in Prince Rupert will receive $900,000 for publicly funded beds announced MLA Jennifer Rice on Feb. 9, 2021. Luke Dufour completes intakes and support work with residents at 333 Trinity House on July 11, 2020. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)

$900,000 for Trinity Men’s Recovery House

Funding will make substance recovery more publicly accessible in Prince Rupert

Trinity Men’s Recovery House in Prince Rupert is receiving $900,000 to convert six private-pay beds to publicly-funded beds making substance abuse and addiction treatment more accessible, Jennifer Rice MLA for the North Coast announced on Feb. 9.

“The difference that Trinity House can make in people’s lives can’t be overstated,” Rice said in a media release. “It’s wonderful that this funding from the province will make the services they provide more accessible to more people, regardless of their ability to pay.”

The funding for the local beds is part of a $13 million initiative that was announced last fall, to support more than 100 beds province-wide.

The BC Government said in the statement this investment is an important step to address the overdose crisis, the media statement reads. “Under the previous government, investments in bed-based care did not meet demand, resulting in long waitlists and lack of service in rural and remote communities.”

“In the northwest, we have too few resources for long-term recovery for men in active addiction and homelessness—dads, fathers, husbands, needing a helping hand up,” Willy Beaudry, executive director, 333 Recovery Homes Society, said.

“This grant is the best news for our society and region and will assist greatly in getting our guys back into the community, with families, into employment, and in a lot of cases, their own places,” he said.

In June 2019 the provincial government introduced its 10-year plan, ‘The Pathway to Hope’, to address and respond to the overdose crisis and to build a comprehensive system of mental health and addictions care for British Columbians.

READ MORE: Heart of our city – Fighting for the road to recovery


K-J Millar | Journalist
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