The Pure Movements dance group performing ‘Coffee, Coffee, Coffee…Americano’ during the 2019 Pacific Northwest Music Festival. (Ken Juniper photo)

Pacific Northwest Music Festival cancelled for 2020 season

Refunds will be issued to participants and sponsors

Organizers of the 55th Annual Pacific Northwest Music Festival (PNMF) have cancelled two-week Terrace event for the 2020 season.

Program coordinator Ken Juniper said the board carefully considered postponing the competition until the COVID-19 pandemic subsided, but decided Tuesday evening (March 16) to call it off entirely.

“We rapidly run into things like grad and final exams, and then finally with summer holidays a lot of kids are out of town. And there’s no telling if we’ll even have the venues back by then. We’ve looked into this in the past, as we always have to move it around, but we have to be careful at how far into the fall we push it.”

READ MORE: ‘We’re living in pretty challenging times’: Bachrach gives thoughts on COVID-19

Entries for the festival closed Jan. 15 with 1,350 people confirmed. Juniper said a refund procedure is being developed for all performers, award providers, patrons and advertisers. Last year $12,930 in prize money was donated by local businesses and individuals.

The cancellation this year adheres to a provincial government ban on gatherings of more than 50 people to help slow COVID-19 infection rates.

In a statement on its website, the PNMF Board stated attempts were made to work around this restriction, and the decision to cancel was not taken lightly.

“Initially we investigated the possibility of saving the festival by restricting the audience size, cancelling all large groups, and similar ideas, however it quickly became apparent that none of these would provide an adequate level of safety for all concerned, including those outside the festival who are working in or using the various venues.

READ MORE: City of Terrace closes all buildings and facilities to public following COVID-19 pandemic spike

“We know the amount of time and effort that everyone involved, in particular the competitors, have put into preparation for the festival, because we ourselves have been there. However, as an arts community we must listen to the health professionals who know how these things work. There is a world of difference between what is happening now and other events we have dealt with in the past.”

Juniper said the board has received strong community support for its decision. The annual festival will resume in 2021.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Heart of Our City – Krysta Ostrom

Fourth generation of family to give heart to Prince Rupert

Pretivm Resources reports fatality at Brucejack mine

The isolated incident occurred last Friday, and the employee passed away on Sunday in hospital

QUIZ: How much do you know about British Columbia?

On this B.C. Day long weekend, put your knowledge of our province to the test

Province restricts non-resident travel to Haida Gwaii amid COVID outbreak

Provincial staff will help enforce travel restrictions from islands, mainland

Strong season but no market for B.C.’s spot prawn fishers

Sector hopeful low prices will catch the eye of local prawn lovers

B.C. records 146 new COVID-19 cases through long weekend

More that 28 people tested positive for the virus each day since Friday

Canucks tame Minnesota Wild 4-3 to even NHL qualifying series

J.T. Miller leads Vancouver with goal and an assist

Cyclist in hospital after being hit by load of lumber hanging from truck on B.C. highway

A man is in hospital with broken ribs, punctured lung and a broken clavicle and scapula

COVID-19 vaccine efforts provide hope but no silver bullet to stop pandemic: Tam

There are more than two dozen vaccines for COVID-19 in clinical trials around the world

Two people die in propane heated outdoor shower near Princeton

Couple was attending a long weekend gathering

Racism in B.C. healthcare: Deadline for First Nations survey coming up on Aug. 6

Survey comes after hospital staff allegedly played a blood alcohol guessing game

‘We want to help’: As overdose deaths spike, beds lay empty at long-term Surrey rehab centre

John Volken Academy searching for ‘students’ to enlist in two-year residential treatment program

Study shines light on what makes LGBTQ+ youth feel safe in a community

The study goes beyond looking at school or family supports

Alberta to require masks at schools this fall, but still no mandate in B.C.

B.C. students are also set to return to classrooms in September

Most Read