Young northwest researchers showcase history at Northwest Regional Heritage Fair

Inside the century-old wooden walls of the North Pacific Cannery, more than 120 students filled the space with heritage projects

Josh Leighton’s presentation on Metlakatla history earned him top praise from Northwest Regional Heritage Fair judges.

Inside the century-old wooden walls of the North Pacific Cannery, more than 120 students filled the space with their own heritage projects where workers once canned salmon.

Young researchers showcased Canadian history at the Northwest Regional Heritage Fair on Monday, May 16. There were 98 different projects by students from six regional schools, including Conrad Elementary, Pineridge Elementary and Annunciation School.

“It was another wonderful day of learning so much about the students passion for things heritage and historical,” said Lesley Moore, the general manager of the North Pacific Cannery. This was the third year the cannery has hosted the fair.

The BC Heritage Fairs Program began in 1994 and runs annually with more than 6,000 students participating. Last year, the cannery had 82 projects and 200 people showed up when the fair opened for public viewing. Moore has been involved in the fair for 15 years, and each year more and more students get inovlved.

Projects ranged from a history of B.C. gold mining, button blankets, Sable Island horses, to the origins of the Relay For Life in Canada. Some students dressed the part, others designed an eye-catching display board.

Jessica Slocombe, a Grade 5 student at Pineridge Elementary was given the Historic Places Intiative Award for her “No Horsin’Around” project.

 

 

Contributed photo

Jessica Slocombe, a Grade 5 student at Pineridge Elementary was given the Historic Places Intiative Award for her “No Horsin’Around” project.

“The students put so much work into it on their own. I’m sure a few parents made suggestions as to how to display things. The teachers’ efforts this year was about to make it more relevant for the kids,” Moore said.

For example, Madison Watkins did her project on First Nations button blankets. She blended North Coast history with her own family history, and wore the button vest for her presentation.

Josh Leighton, won for his project on Metlakatla’s history. For his presentation he had artifacts from what was used in the past and compared it with items that are used today in the community, such as an old bowl and a fishing hook.

READ MORE: HERITAGE FAIR PROGRAM RECEIVES B.C. AWARD

The new B.C. curriculum supports programs such as the Heritage Fair, Moore explained. It encourages students to get out in their community and use the resources in their own communities.

Dale Boyle was the heritage coach at Conrad Elementary School.

She brought 12 teams to present.

“It’s rewarding to see. Research can be tiring but a week and a half before the Heritage Fair these kids try to improve the projects on their own and the learning comes alive,” Boyle said.

Projects were adjudicated by 14 judges who came from the Museum of Northern B.C., Port Edward Historical Society Board, Kitimat Museum, Terrace Heritage Park Museum and other areas of expertise.

Emily Gordon, a Grade 4 student at Pineridge Elementary, was given the BC Magazine Award for her project on “The Relay for Life."Contributed photo

Emily Gordon, a Grade 4 student at Pineridge Elementary, was given the BC Magazine Award for her project on “The Relay for Life.”

It was Laurie Davie’s first year as a judge. She worked at a museum in Ontario before moving to the North Coast. She’s now a cannery board member and volunteer.

“The details of the project was amazing with people fairly young, like Grade 4 students,” Davie said. Every student has a pair of judges ask them questions such as the motivation for their project, how they did their research and if they had unlimited time and resources what would they have added.

This year had 12 winners in nine different categories, but only three were selected to represent the region at the B.C. Provincial Fair in Vancouver this July. The winners were, Josh Leighton for his “Melakatla” project, Malachi Veri for “A Park with Two Names” and Tyler Henry for the “LA Hal” project.

The fair drew parents, relatives, teachers, elders, volunteers and some Grade 3 students who came to learn and prepare for participating next year.

 

Just Posted

‘Tis the season for giving and auctioning in Prince Rupert and Port Edward

Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society and Church of Christ the King raising money for their kids

Coastal GasLink receives first delivery of pipe sections

Company expects to begin welding and pipe laying in 2020

Prince Rupert wooed by Hometown Hockey, going over the top to answer the call

City is excited to showcase Prince Rupert’s livability — and hockey fandom — on the national stage

Northwest B.C. wildlife shelter rescues particularly tiny bear cub

Shelter co-founder says the cub weighs less than a third of what it should at this time of year

Gitga’at and LNG Canada announce new Marine Emergency Response and Research Facility in Hartley Bay

LNG Canada providing financial support as committed in 2014 Impact Mitigation and Benefit Agreement

WATCH: Jingle Boat, Jingle Boat, jingle all the way

Santa Claus visited the kids of Prince Rupert on the Inside Passage

The Northern View presents Santa Shops Here in Prince Rupert

More reasons to spend your shopping dollars locally

B.C. boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

Residents in B.C. city could face 133% tax hike in ‘worst case’ lawsuit outcome: report

An average home could see a tax increase of $2,164 in one year

B.C. Transit finds 28 used fareboxes online, saves $300,000

‘Someone joked maybe we can buy used fareboxes on eBay,’ CEO says

Many of Canada’s working poor can’t afford lawyers, don’t qualify for legal aid

One lawyer says many people earn too much to qualify for legal aid, but not enough to really live on

Economy lost 71,200 jobs in November, unemployment rate climbs to 5.9%

Jobless rate is at its highest since August 2018, when it hit 6%

VIDEO: John Lennon’s iconic Rolls Royce rolls into Vancouver Island college for checkup

Royal BC Museum, Camosun College and Coachwerks Restorations come together to care for car

VIDEO: Rockslide closes part of Highway 93 in Fairmont Hot Springs

Geotechnical team called in to do an assessment after rocks fell from hoodoos

Most Read