Sheryl Sadorski-Gordon speaks at the Relay For Life fundraiser on Feb.20

Sheryl Sadorski-Gordon speaks at the Relay For Life fundraiser on Feb.20

Too inspired to be tired

If someone had mentioned Relay For Life to Sheryl Sadorski-Gordon more than a year ago she said she wouldn’t have had a clue what it was

If someone had mentioned Relay For Life to Sheryl Sadorski-Gordon more than a year ago she said she wouldn’t have had a clue of what it was.

Now, the Relay For Life, in support of the Canadian Cancer Society, is an ongoing mission in Sadorski-Gordon’s life. She was diagnosed with cervical cancer and is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatments at the Prince Rupert Regional Hospital.

Last year, her friends put together a team for the relay — Too Inspired To Be Tired: Sheryl’s Warriors. It was the biggest team with 22 people and they raised the most with $11,000 in donations.

On Saturday,  Sadorski-Gordon was one of the main organizers  of the Relay for Life Loonie and Live Auction hosted by the MC duo of Keith Lambourne and Doug Kydd at the Crest Hotel.

“This year I’m going to relay for those who’d didn’t get a chance to fight,” Sadorski-Gordon said in front of the crowd to kick off the night.

But Sadorski-Gordon wasn’t the only member of the team with a mission to fight cancer.

In October, 2015, Christa Scott, also a team member, faced her own tragedy. Her mother, Judy, who had donated $7,000 to the team, was diagnosed and passed away from gastric cancer within three weeks.

More than 60 businesses and organizations donated prizes to be auctioned off including two flights with WestJet anywhere in Canada, which went for $2,500.

By the end of the fundraising event the team had raised more than $10,900 to add to the $2,000 they raised in the previous months. They will continue to fundraise up until May 28, when the relay takes place.

“Cancer is expensive to have and the Relay for Life not only supports research, it supports families, it supports the funds that they have to help people with expenses. The relay does more than what we realize and it saves peoples lives,” Sadorski-Gordon said.