During the lunar eclipse at 5:55 a.m. on the North Coast, the moon turned red and orange, a.k.a. the “blood moon”. (Jonathon Bartlett photo)

During the lunar eclipse at 5:55 a.m. on the North Coast, the moon turned red and orange, a.k.a. the “blood moon”. (Jonathon Bartlett photo)

Super blue blood moon on the North Coast

Photos of the rare blood lunar eclipse, supermoon and blue moon event from Haida Gwaii

While rain and clouds hindered visibility on the North Coast, Haida Gwaii had an opening to view the super blue blood moon Wednesday morning, Jan. 31.

From Masset, Jonathon Bartlett snapped photos of the blood moon at 5:55 a.m. and then the lunar eclipse from 6:26 a.m. until 7 a.m., when the clouds rolled in.

“I checked it at 3 a.m. and [it] was too cloudy, and got set up for 5:45 a.m., five minutes later all the cloud blew away giving a perfect view of the blood moon,” Bartlett said in an email.

READ MORE: Super blue blood moon coming to skies near you



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The earth blocked the light falling on the moon during the Jan. 31 lunar eclipse. (Jonathon Bartlett photo)

The earth blocked the light falling on the moon during the Jan. 31 lunar eclipse. (Jonathon Bartlett photo)

The shadow of the earth fell on the moon this morning at around 6:26 a.m.-7 a.m. for the rare blood lunar eclipse, supermoon and blue moon event. (Jonathon Bartlett photo)

The shadow of the earth fell on the moon this morning at around 6:26 a.m.-7 a.m. for the rare blood lunar eclipse, supermoon and blue moon event. (Jonathon Bartlett photo)

(Jonathon Bartlett photo)

(Jonathon Bartlett photo)

(Jonathon Bartlett photo)

(Jonathon Bartlett photo)

(Jonathon Bartlett photo)

(Jonathon Bartlett photo)