Martin Schouw ran all 150 kilometres of Highway 16 between Terrace and Prince Rupert to raise money for the Action for Animals in Distress Society.

Martin Schouw ran all 150 kilometres of Highway 16 between Terrace and Prince Rupert to raise money for the Action for Animals in Distress Society.

Schouw-ing what’s possible

Martin Schouw recently made the grueling run from Terrace to Rupert — with some help from his friends

Running has become engrained in Martin Schouw’s DNA. Having taken up the sport three years ago as a way to break the cycle of addiction, there is now barely a day Schouw is not putting in the kilometres on Prince Rupert’s roads and trails.

If there’s a race in the area, Schouw is sure to be a part of it. Outside the region — he’ll travel to it. Schouw’s passion could be summed up this September during Prince Rupert’s Cannery Road Race. Schouw finished the 21-kilometre course in 1:44:55 — five seconds under his goal. While most runners took the remainder of the day for some rest and relaxation, Schouw’s trip from the North Pacific Cannery in Port Edward back home to Prince Rupert was by foot — all 24 kilometres of it.

Martin Schouw pauses as he hits the approximate 1/3 mark of the run between Terrace and Prince Rupert. (Submitted photo)

Those 45 kilometres would prove to be just a portion of his next endeavour. A late September run from Terrace to Prince Rupert was next up for the relentless runner, every metre of the 150-kilometre journey coming of course by foot.

READ MORE: MVP of the Week: Martin Schouw ready for his biggest challenge yet

Schouw had a few goals in tackling the daunting, yet beautiful, Skeena River route. First and foremost, Schouw used the experience as an opportunity to raise money for his charity of choice, Action for Animals in Distress Society, which seeks to rescue and feed neighbourhood animals. A trip to Schouw’s storage locker, piled high and stacked deep with food for cats and dogs, show this is no casual cause.

Schouw runs to better the lives of area animals in need. His dogs Hutch, Macy and Boomer were on hand for emotional support in this quest. (Submitted photo)

Schouw also wanted to prove that personally he could pull off the task. When Schouw first started running he would strain to finish a 5K. Marathons were a far off goal, and traversing Terrace to Rupert was likely unthinkable.

Schouw found that he would have plenty of support along the way, in both towns. Fellow runner and Terracite Adam Brown — who had beat Schouw by two minutes in the Cannery Road Race — once again ran with Schouw. Brown met up with Schouw at 4 a.m., ran seven kilometres with him, ran back to go to work, then was back on the road to meet Martin as he arrived in Prince Rupert.

“He ran all the way into Rupert with me, and stayed right by my side as I was hobbling,” Schouw recalls. “Then he drove home at 4:30 a.m.”

A number of others pitched in their support as well, including Cecil Gallant who biked much of the way with Schouw, and “Big Ernie” Westgarth, who helped guide the way for Schouw in his truck.

Friends Tracy Michelle, Andrea Nelson and Denise Gallant provided plenty of assistance. And of course, there was Schouw’s partner Carrie Coley, who could be counted on for encouraging chalk messages all along the winding road.

Adam Brown, Tracey Michelle and Andrea Nelson joined Schouw on his run for encouragement and support. (Submitted photo)

Schouw’s partner Carrie Coley left plenty of encouraging messages along the highway. (Submitted photo)

“I really don’t know if I even would have finished without all the support I had,” Schouw said. “I never dreamed I would have that much support. I would do it again tomorrow, just for all the good people that I met and how awesome it was they all came together.”

READ MORE: Rupert sees its runners bolt to top times at The Northern View Cannery Road Race

READ MORE: The Northern View Cannery Road Race: Photos and video

As Schouw neared the conclusion of his journey though, he realized something was wrong. After ascending the Rainbow Summit, Schouw mentioned to Gallant that there was a problem with his foot. Schouw powered through however and triumphantly ran into Rupert, approximately 18 hours after leaving the neighbouring city.

Cecil Gallant hopped on his bike and joined Martin Schouw for his run to Rupert. (Submitted photo)

Schouw’s many friends kept his spirits high throughout his run. (Submitted photo)

“I just had so much support that I couldn’t stop, I couldn’t let everybody down. The closer we got to Rupert the more people came, it was just overwhelming,” Schouw said.

The next day, Schouw was in the hospital.

The stress of the run had caused his tendons to swell at an alarming rate. An emergency fasciotomy was performed to save Schouw’s foot. Luckily, he received treatment just in time. A 10-inch incision would leave Schouw with a reminder of the toll of such a run, as well as enthusiastic thanks for his doctors.

Just in case there was any doubt, the injury is not keeping Schouw down. “The rest of my body really wasn’t that sore. I could have ran Butze if it wasn’t for my foot,” Schouw said.

Schouw was certainly off his feet for awhile though, and forced to take time away from the activity he loves. Recently though, he has returned to light running and exercise. He expects to be back in marathon form before very long.

“I wanted to know if I could go the distance, and I don’t think I could ever be more rewarded than the supporters I’ve gotten from town, from Rupert Runners and from my friends coming together, and my Facebook clan backing me. It humbled me,” Schouw said of his help along the way.

The support extended to the donation side as well, with $5,180 raised for Action for Animals. Schouw says that despite the scary outcome, he would do it all again in an instant. After all he has been through, this will be the last thing to keep him off the road.

“It will take more than a bad foot to stop me.”

Schouw raised more than $5,000 on the run that will go toward Action for Animals in Distress. Rosanne Komlos from Terrace and Carrie Coley assist Schouw with the presentation of the cheque. (Alex Kurial / The Northern View)


Alex Kurial | Journalist
Alex Kurial 
Send Alex email
Like the The Northern View on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

running

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A ball balances on the rim. New basketball court surfaces and nets will be installed as part of the McBride Street Multi-sport Court Redevelopment project to which Pembina donated $20,000. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Nothing but net for $20,000 Pembina donation

McBride Street multi-sport court redevelopment project in the planning

Ben Spencer has overcome the challenges of having a tenth-grade education and imparts the importance of education by teaching Sm’alygax to students. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Heart of our city: Ben Spencer

Teacher of traditional language and Sm’alygax fluency

FILE – Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs have agreed to sign a memorandum on rights and title with B.C. and Ottawa, but elected chiefs are demanding it be called off over lack of consultation. (Thom Barker photo)
Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, Lake Babine Nation get provincial funding for land, title rights

Government says it’s a new, flexible model for future agreements between Canada, B.C. and First Nations.

I want to fly higher. Eva Moore and her brother Leroy Moore are treated to some high pushes from Simon Temple while swinging at Moose Tot Park on April 15. (Photo: K-J Millar/The Northern View)
Photo Gallery: Prince Rupert tots enjoy fun in the sun

Warmer weather is attracting kids of all ages to play outside

The property on which a residential school (pictured) that was torn down years ago in Lower Post is to be the location of a cultural centre. (Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre photo)
Lower Post residential school building to be demolished, replaced with cultural centre

Project to be funded by federal and provincial governments, Daylu Dena Council

Vancouver resident Beryl Pye was witness to a “concerning,” spontaneous dance party that spread throughout social groups at Kitsilano Beach on April 16. (Screen grab/Beryl Pye)
VIDEO: Dance party erupts at Vancouver’s Kitsilano Beach to the dismay of onlookers

‘It was a complete disregard for current COVID-19 public health orders,’ says Vancouver resident Beryl Pye

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland responds to a question during Question Period in the House of Commons Tuesday December 8, 2020 in Ottawa. The stage is set for arguably the most important federal budget in recent memory, as the Liberal government prepares to unveil its plan for Canada’s post-pandemic recovery even as a third wave of COVID-19 rages across the country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Election reticence expected to temper political battle over federal budget

Opposition parties have laid out their own demands in the weeks leading up to the budget

A syringe is loaded with COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. to open up COVID vaccine registration to all B.C. residents 18+ in April

Registration does not equate to being able to book an appointment

(Black Press file photo).
UPDATED: Multiple stabbings at Vancouver Island bush party

Three youths hospitalized after an assault in Comox

Selina Robinson is shown in Coquitlam, B.C., on Friday November 17, 2017. British Columbia’s finance minister says her professional training as a family therapist helped her develop the New Democrat government’s first budget during the COVID-19 pandemic, which she will table Tuesday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. finance minister to table historic pandemic-challenged deficit budget

Budget aims to take care of people during pandemic while preparing for post-COVID-19 recovery, Robinson said

Each spring, the Okanagan Fest-of-Ale is held in Penticton. This year, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the festival will not be held. However, beer is still available. How much do you know about this beverage? (pxfuel.com)
QUIZ: How much do you really know about beer?

Put your knowledge to the test with this short quiz

Lord Tweedsmuir’s Tremmel States-Jones jumps a player and the goal line to score a touchdown against the Kelowna Owls in 2019. The face of high school football, along with a majority of other high school sports, could significantly change if a new governance proposal is passed at the B.C. School Sports AGM May 1. (Malin Jordan)
Power struggle: New governance model proposed for B.C. high school sports

Most commissions are against the new model, but B.C. School Sports (BCSS) and its board is in favour

Pall Bearers carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh, followed by the Prince of Wales, left and Princess Anne, right, into St George’s Chapel for his funeral, at Windsor Castle, in Windsor, England, Saturday April 17, 2021. (Danny Lawson/Pool via AP)
Trudeau announces $200K donation to Duke of Edinburgh award as Prince Philip laid to rest

A tribute to the late prince’s ‘remarkable life and his selfless service,’ the Prime Minister said Saturday

Most Read