Capt. Colin Henthorne reveals a first-hand account of what really happened on the night of the Queen of the North disaster.

Queen of the North captain compelled to write his story

Captain of the ship Colin Henthorne reveals a first-hand account of what really happened that night in his latest book

March 22, 2006 was a dark day for those aboard the Queen of the North, which struck an underwater ledge off Gil Island, 135 kilometres south of Prince Rupert.

Captain of the ship Colin Henthorne reveals a first-hand account of what really happened that night in his latest book The Queen of the North Disaster.

“I explain in the book how the ship is manned, how it’s run. It’s a car-carrying passenger ship. It’s not the same as the ferries you’re probably most familiar with on the southern coast,” said Henthorne, adding that it looks similar in appearance to a cruise ship of a certain era.

With 101 people on board, two have never been found and are presumed dead.

“We evacuated the ship with no outside assistance whatsoever. The assistance that came was after we were well clear of the ship and we were in rafts and boats and not in any danger,” said Henthorne.

The ship was a BC Ferries passenger vessel.

Following the disaster, Helmswoman Karen Briker was fired and fourth mate Karl Lilgert was charged with criminal negligence causing death. He was sentenced to four years in prison.

Henthorne was not on watch at the time of the sinking, although he said the captain is not on the bridge most of the time, only when required.

“So we have four officers that do the navigating. At least one is on the bridge, sometimes two. The captain goes on the bridge as he feels fit,” he said.

In recalling what happened the night of the devastating sinking, Henthorne said he didn’t start writing his story as a book, but started writing that same day.

When he was taken to Prince Rupert and put into a hotel room for four days, he jotted down all the details of what happened so he wouldn’t forget. Shortly thereafter, he was having to write in response to the investigations.

“They did send a submersible down and got the hard drive out of the navigation computer,” he said.

He said investigators interviewed many people several times, and him at least three times. His story, he said, is one of many, but it’s the first to be written  for the public to see and is his firsthand account of the incident and his response to what has been said about the sinking.

This is Henthorne’s first book and he said when he writes things, they have to be in response to something, And the sinking of the ship, he said, was a big thing.

“I started writing because I had to write.”

Henthorne currently lives in North Saanich and is a rescue co-ordinator with the Coast Guard.

 

Just Posted

Rainmakers wait out storm in Vancouver

Prince Rupert basketball team mentally prepare for home opener at Charles Hays gym on Friday

Council to host public hearing on cannabis sales zone

A look ahead to tonight’s Prince Rupert City council meeting

Another windstorm expected Monday, causing ferry delay

With another windstorm expected to hit Haida Gwaii on Monday afternoon, BC… Continue reading

Grim situation in coming year for northwest, B.C. fisheries

Annual post-season review in Prince Rupert informs DFO on how to manage 2019 fishing season

Nurses wanted, Northern Health promotes Prince Rupert in new video

There are 38 nursing job positions available in the area

Prince Rupert Rampage host Teddy Bear night

Prince Rupert Rampage teamed up with the Salvation Army to give back this weekend

Shop Prince Rupert is back

These businesses are all taking part in the Shop Prince Rupert event until December 21 at noon

‘Abhorrent’ condition of autistic B.C. boy shows flaws in care system: report

‘Charlie’ was underweight and ‘covered in feces’ when he was removed from his mom’s care

Military closes book on oft-criticized support unit for ill, injured troops

The transition unit will provide support and services to military members struggling with physical and mental injuries so they can return to work.

Vancouver Canucks rookie Elias Pettersson named NHL’s first star of the week

Canucks centre scored two goals and six assists in three games

Protester says Canada doing U.S. ‘dirty work’ outside Huawei exec’s bail hearing

The U.S. wants to extradite Meng to face fraud allegations after Canada arrested the high-profile technology executive.

Break-in at home of detained Chinese Huawei executive

Meng Wanzhou was detained in Vancouver on America’s request

Natural gas rates will go up in B.C. on Jan. 1

Regions could pay up to $68 more

Top House Dems raise prospect of impeachment, jail for Trump

It could be an “impeachable offense” if it’s proven that President Donald Trump directed illegal hush-money payments to women during the 2016 campaign.

Most Read