Seji Sahdra and Dylan Dickson work on an activity as a part of Genome BC’s Geneskool program at Charles Hays Secondary School on Nov. 15. (Matthew Allen / The Northern View)

Prince Rupert students learn with scientific building blocks

Video on Geneskool, a learning program Genome BC brought to SD 52 Nov. 14 - 20

Prince Rupert students have had the opportunity to build their scientific understanding block-by-block.

Genome BC, a non-profit organization that funds genome research and education, brought a learning program to School District 52 from Nov. 14 – 20 called Geneskool. Instructors visited Charles Hays Secondary School (CHSS) and Prince Rupert Middle School (PRMS) where they enhanced students’ understanding of biology concepts in a fun and interesting context.

READ MORE: Robots take over Roosevelt Elementary School for programming competition

Alex Chattwood and Eva Yap, two Genome BC instructors, led a CHSS morning science class through exercises where students used Lego blocks to learn about how DNA sequencing works to create different types of proteins.

“That’s just a little bit more fun than looking into a textbook and seeing how it all works,” said Chattwood. “And we all tie it back to biology with some discussions.”

Chattwood added that it is important for students to learn the basics of these concepts not only for their academic success, but also to be able to function in a world that is advancing rapidly from both a technological and scientific standpoint. Scientific illiteracy is something that students can no longer afford if they want to navigate modern society effectively and make the best, most well-informed decisions.

“So the big picture thing is that we go in and try to give them those concepts in a way that doesn’t turn them away from science and makes them think about going into scientific careers,” Chattwood said. “And if not going into scientific careers, making them aware that science isn’t a scary thing and that it can be enjoyed and understood by everyone.”

Aman Gill, a Grade 12 student at CHSS, was in the class that participated in the morning Geneskool session. He said that a lot of his classmates grew up playing with Lego and using it to make theoretical concepts more practical was enjoyable.

“A lot of people might not actually learn best in the classroom, but with this you can actually see work being done,” he said. “It makes it a lot easier for visual learners.”

READ MORE: Becomming binary literate



newsroom@thenorthernview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Prince Rupert Fire Rescue responds to gas leak on Third Ave.

Prince Rupert Fire Rescue was dispatched to a carbon monoxide alarm

LETTER: Closed door is best deterrent in Port Edward

Re: Council decision Nov. 26 to reject rezoning of adjacent properties to Kinnikinnick campground

Sports Briefs: Skating, Seawolves and Rainmakers basketball

Wins all around, plus some mini Olympic fun

COCULLO & KURIAL: Reporters at home with Hometown Hockey

Everyone we interacted with went above and beyond to involve us in the experience.

Only one week left for Santa Shops Here grand prize

Inland Air harbour tour for four up for grabs

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

UPDATED: Investigators confirm three died in B.C. plane crash

Transport Canada provides information bulletin, family of victim releases statement

Prime Minister sets 2025 timeline for plan to remove fish farms from B.C. waters

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Canada’s Attorney General looking to larger reforms on doctor-assisted death

The Quebec Superior Court gave Ottawa just six months — until March 2020 — to amend the law

Wagon wheels can now be any size: B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Indigenous mother wins $20,000 racial discrimination case against Vancouver police

Vancouver Police Board ordered to pay $20,000 and create Indigenous-sensitivity training

Sentencing for B.C. father who murdered two young daughters starts Monday

The bodies of Aubrey, 4, and Chloe, 6, were found in Oak Bay father’s apartment Dec. 25, 2017

B.C. vet talks tips for winter travel with pets

Going to see the vet the day before a trip is never a good idea

Most Read